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#77178 - 05/10/01 02:18 PM electrical work in basement
COMISC Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 05/10/01
Posts: 4
question 1:
I'm working on my unfinished basement. Is there a code on how high electrical outlets in the basement should be?

question 2:
Do I need a separate circuit for the basement?

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#77179 - 05/10/01 03:24 PM Re: electrical work in basement
Anonymous
Unregistered


Make your outlets as high as you wish. Between 18 and 72 inches usually suits me. Might your basement flood?

Personally I would put in a GFCI breaker and run the basement lights from that. You can also daisy chain through a GFCI receptacle which is cheaper by about $29 assuming that you still have to buy a single regular breaker.

You didn't say what loads (laundry?) you will have or how big it is.

Several separate circuits may be in order.
Is the load center in the basement?

Keep in mind that many tools are 9-15 amps.
One 20 amp circuit doesn't go very far when you start plugging big things into it.

Make sure all unfinished basement outlets are GFCI protected.

An unfinished area to me means that there is not padded carpeting wall-to-wall or girders or metal pipes are exposed.

You don't ever want water to get into your GFCI devices.

[This message has been edited by Dspark (edited 05-10-2001).]

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#77180 - 05/10/01 05:20 PM Re: electrical work in basement
sparky Offline
Member

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
Dspark, lights on a GFI?....

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#77181 - 05/10/01 05:57 PM Re: electrical work in basement
Anonymous
Unregistered


 Quote:
lights on a GFI?....

In an unfinished basement, yes!

Nowhere did I say that the code requires it (I said: "Personally").

This sounded like a DIY question and I recommended something above the minimum for the protection of him/herself and whoever else might be in that basement changing a bulb or whatever.

If he/she makes a neutral to ground error, etc, the GFCI will trip too.

GFCI is less forgiving of improper wiring.

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#77182 - 05/11/01 12:48 PM Re: electrical work in basement
COMISC Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 05/10/01
Posts: 4
I had a small leak on the wall but I patched it with some epoxy material. No major flood.

There's already a circuit for the washer and dryer. I don't think I should be using it anyway. Or can I?

Load? Just small appliances, stereo, TV... etc. I think I should use a different circuit for the light and the outlet so I don't loose the light if my outlet gets shorted.

You're right about using GFCI.

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#77183 - 05/11/01 02:10 PM Re: electrical work in basement
Glenn Offline
Member

Registered: 01/17/01
Posts: 78
Is this a dwelling or a commerical bldg ?

Glenn

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#77184 - 05/11/01 03:14 PM Re: electrical work in basement
COMISC Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 05/10/01
Posts: 4
It's a dwelling. Why you ask?

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#77185 - 05/11/01 10:20 PM Re: electrical work in basement
Anonymous
Unregistered


 Quote:
There's already a circuit for the washer and dryer. I don't think I should be using it anyway. Or can I?
No, let it alone. The laundry circuit should be dedicated under the current code.
Yes, go with the GFCI, even in the lights if possible. Though someone my mention that fluorescents could cause nuisance tripping, I have not found that to be the case with the new electronic (instant start) balasts.

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#77186 - 05/12/01 03:54 AM Re: electrical work in basement
sparky Offline
Member

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
Cosmic;
i seriously suggest you pass your plans by the local AHJ, or even better, have an inspection done by one after you've finished your 'rough' before you close this in.

By AHJ i mean an NEC inspector, not a home inspector, inspector gadget , or any other pheudo-type.

Do this, and you and yours will sleep well


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#77187 - 05/12/01 07:50 AM Re: electrical work in basement
Bill Addiss Offline
Member

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 4196
Loc: NY, USA
COMISC,

 Quote:
I think I should use a different circuit for the light and the outlet so I don't loose the light if my outlet gets shorted.


This is always a good Idea. As far as the lighting on the GFCI, That's got to be your call. As Dspark says it will give you more personal protection fron shock, but if the lights go out on you (nuisance tripping) will that pose another type of hazard? Only you know the circumstances of your room layout and it's probable usage.


And, yes, new circuits would be called for. An inspection (by Electrical Inspector or consultation with a Licensed Electrician) is always recommended for your personal safety and it could save you money. If you do not do things according to code rules you may end up having to tear things apart later on.
I see it happen all the time!


Bill

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