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#70919 - 10/16/06 04:25 PM Countertop outlet
HCE727 Offline
Member

Registered: 11/11/05
Posts: 190
Loc: Delaware County, PA, USA
Check out www.mockett.com. Type in the search bar PCS34.
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#70920 - 10/16/06 04:58 PM Re: Countertop outlet
GA76JW Offline
Member

Registered: 03/20/04
Posts: 195
Loc: Suwanee, GA USA
The face almost looks cartoonish to me.

Looks like a good idea though. I can see where it would be nice in some cicumstances.
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#70921 - 10/16/06 04:58 PM Re: Countertop outlet
HotLine1 Offline

Member

Registered: 04/03/02
Posts: 6804
Loc: Brick, NJ USA
OK:

"Important Note: PCS34 MUST be plugged into a wall socket incorporating a GFCI."

Now, a GFI 'under' the counter top to plug this puppy into??

IMHO, space them per NEC requirements (resi) & I MAY accept it.

Kinda neat!!

John
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#70922 - 10/16/06 05:26 PM Re: Countertop outlet
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant
Member

Registered: 01/22/05
Posts: 5305
Loc: Blue Collar Country
I like it! While it is still a "tombstone," it sure looks a lot better.

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#70923 - 10/16/06 05:45 PM Re: Countertop outlet
e57 Offline
Member

Registered: 05/27/03
Posts: 2837
Loc: S.F.,CA USA
Now to beat it to death.... 'Cause the inspectors out there will.... I know mine would.

Is it rated for 20A? The spacing requirements are there to reduce the use of extention cords - this is in effect an "Extention Cord" 9' long! And intended to be installed beyond finish.

 Quote:
Size: 13 21/32" overall depth, 4 1/16" overall diameter. Fits into 3 5/32" hole cutout. Extends 11 3/8" below table top.

Important Note: PCS34 MUST be plugged into a wall socket incorporating a GFCI.

Is it subject to physical damage by drawers and other goings on below the CT?

If they stop making them will you be able to replace it to cover spacing?

 Quote:
210.52C(5) Receptacle Outlet Location. Receptacle outlets shall be located above, but not more than 500 mm (20 in.) above, the countertop. Receptacle outlets rendered not readily accessible by appliances fastened in place, appliance garages, or appliances occupying dedicated space shall not be considered as these required outlets.
Exception: To comply with the conditions specified in (a) or (b), receptacle outlets shall be permitted to be mounted not more than 300 mm (12 in.) below the countertop. Receptacles mounted below a countertop in accordance with this exception shall not be located where the countertop extends more than 150 mm (6 in.) beyond its support base.
(a) Construction for the physically impaired.
(b) On island and peninsular countertops where the countertop is flat across its entire surface (no backsplashes, dividers, etc.) and there are no means to mount a receptacle within 500 mm (20 in.) above the countertop, such as an overhead cabinet.
Note it says 'receptical outlets' - not extention cords or plug strips....

Anyway.... IMO, if it were designed differently - say lower profile so cabs would not need to be re-designed, and was rated at 20a hard-wired. And maybe used replacable devices.... Like the hard-wired version of this one: http://www.mockett.com./default.asp?ID=4&action=detail&partCode=PCS19


I might think that was pretty cool. But as-is, I could not get away with installing them in a kitchen IMO. Office, yeah why not...

[This message has been edited by e57 (edited 10-16-2006).]
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"Well - I oughta....." -Jackie Gleason

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#70924 - 10/17/06 11:44 AM Re: Countertop outlet
Ann Brush Offline
Member

Registered: 12/27/05
Posts: 155
Loc: Ohia
I use my counter tops. Rule # 1 any object permanently on the countertop MUST be capable of being rigorusly cleaned (ie with water). Hence the name "backsplash" for the wall perpendicular to the counter. How long before syrup (insert your fav. sticky substance here) gets between the rubber flange on top and the counter, that's the last time you are opening it without the "power riser" option.

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#70925 - 10/17/06 12:47 PM Re: Countertop outlet
BigJohn Offline
Member

Registered: 03/06/04
Posts: 352
Loc: Boston, MA
That doesn't look like much of a lip around the base of it. I can see it being opened during the cooking process and left open for hours on end while all kinds of water and juice and liquid get spread all over that counter...and then flow right down into the receptacle base.

If it forms a tight seal while closed, it's a neat idea for surfaces that have to be occasionally cleaned, but not for surfaces that will get wet while it's open.

-John

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#70926 - 10/17/06 05:49 PM Re: Countertop outlet
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant
Member

Registered: 01/22/05
Posts: 5305
Loc: Blue Collar Country
There are few areas more frustrating than couters, and their receptacles.

Part of this is because the sparky is left out of the equation until the customer and the cabinet shop have their minds made up. I guarantee that neither of them gives a moment's thought to the electrician.

Part is because the code panel has drifetd away from safety, and into design. It's easy to confuse "ideal" with "OK."

I see no code requirement that every receptacle be "rated" for 20 amps. It is allowed to place 15 amp receptacles on 20 amp circuits.

Something that is considered "ugly" is going to be deleted. I applaud this manufacturer's attempt to come up with something of which the stylist will approve.

I find it rather difficult to drill square holes. One advantage to this device is that you need only the right hole saw to add a receptacle where needed.

Damage to wires within the cabinets is a concern. Cabinet shops seem to delight in making drawers that go all the way back. I am sure that if a penninsula were made that was 5 ft wide, there would be 5 ft deep drawers.

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#70927 - 10/17/06 06:20 PM Re: Countertop outlet
Almost Fried Offline
Member

Registered: 09/04/06
Posts: 104
Loc: Madison County, Ark. USA
and I just love any manufacturer who refers to "...3 110 volt outlets..."

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#70928 - 10/20/06 12:44 AM Re: Countertop outlet
e57 Offline
Member

Registered: 05/27/03
Posts: 2837
Loc: S.F.,CA USA
"I see no code requirement that every receptacle be "rated" for 20 amps. It is allowed to place 15 amp receptacles on 20 amp circuits."

True, but where does it say a 9' 15a extention cord count as the required receptical? Now if it were say hard wired as a "Cord drop" it might, but would be need to be rated for 20A. That was my thinking there. IMO pitching this as a suitable replacement for the code required receptical is nothing but trouble, and misleading to designers and architechs who generally have no idea of codes or thier meaning - and those who just dont care.
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"Well - I oughta....." -Jackie Gleason

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