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#6896 - 01/13/02 07:54 AM A pint's a pound.....
pauluk Offline

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Looks like Tuesday wlll be my last call here for a while, so here's some parting trivia for you. (Not directly electric related but what the heck!)

I guess most of you have heard the saying "A pint's a pound the world around."

Unfortuately that means that the world must end somewhere west of the British Isles, because a few of our "Imperial" measurements are slightly different than U.S. Customary units.

1 Imperial pint = 20 fl. oz. (not 16)

Thus the quart & gallon are correspondingly larger as well. (The U.S. gallon is actually the older unit, used in England several centuries ago.)

We also use the "long" ton of 2240 lb., the U.S. 2000 lb. ton being called a "short ton."

There are still 20 cwt to the ton, so our hundredweight is actually 112 lb.

We also have a measurement called the "stone," which is 14 lb. It's most often used by people giving their weight, so a Brit weighing, say, 158 lb. would be most likely to say he weighs 11 st. 4 lb. (Unless he's been Americanized like me, of course! )

Just thought you'd like another demonstration of how language differences could lead to confusion.

For an idea of the fight to keep our measurements, go here:

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Arc Flash Clothing, Gloves, KneePads, Tool Belts, Pouches, Tool Carriers, etc. etc....

#6897 - 01/13/02 08:42 AM Re: A pint's a pound.....
sparky66wv Offline

Registered: 11/17/00
Posts: 2334
Loc: West Virginia
Good luck to you Paul, it has been a pleasure having you around the forum. Do stop in from time to time when you get the chance...


#6898 - 01/13/02 09:18 AM Re: A pint's a pound.....
Joe Tedesco Offline

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 3325
Loc: Boston, Massachusetts USA
If 4 - 500 kcmil copper thw conductors were run in a raceway from a basement to a roof switchboard, how much would all of the copper weigh?

Reason for question is related to supports required in vertical runs and Table 310-19
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

#6899 - 01/13/02 11:28 AM Re: A pint's a pound.....
sparky Offline

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
bet it'll take more than a 12.5 stone dude like me to pull it...

looks like the little stinker had a point?;

"The new system of weights and measures will be a stumbling block and the source of difficulties for several generations.....It's just tormenting people with trivia!!!"
Napoleon 1 on the introduction of metrication

keep a stiff upper lip as you Britts would say!

aka sparky

#6900 - 01/13/02 11:59 AM Re: A pint's a pound.....
Bill Addiss Offline

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 4196
Loc: NY, USA

Good Luck to you over there. I hope that you find something good real fast. Too bad that you don't have a digital camera, you'll probably see some good electrical photo-ops (?) as you go across the countryside.

We'll miss you, hurry back!


#6901 - 01/13/02 04:20 PM Re: A pint's a pound.....
Redsy Offline

Registered: 03/28/01
Posts: 2138
Loc: Bucks County PA
If you ever make your way into the Phila. area. I'll buy the first pint and we will pound them down.

#6902 - 01/14/02 11:26 AM Re: A pint's a pound.....
pauluk Offline

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Yeah, it's incredible that in this supposedly free country, a shopkeeper can now be prosecuted and get a criminal record for selling bananas by the pound instead of the kilogram. Meanwhile teenage muggers get sent on trips to Jamaica at tax-payers expense because they "had a deprived childhood." (This has really happened!) Makes me soooo mad.

Anyhow, thanks for all your good wishes. Keep Sparkin' everybody!

#6903 - 01/14/02 11:40 AM Re: A pint's a pound.....
WARREN1 Offline

Registered: 05/09/01
Posts: 184
Loc: Greenville, SC, USA
According to my Anixter catalog, Type THW 500kcMil copper conductor weighs in at 1685 lbs per 1000 ft. So how high is it? At 4 X 1.685 X 30 feet = 202.2 lbs.
Good luck on your journey, and come back to see us again.
(From upstate South Carolina)


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