The Electrical Contractor Network

ECN Electrical Forum
Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals

Books, Tools and Test Equipment for Electrical and Construction Trades

Register Now!

Register Now!

We want your input!

Featured:
   

2017 NEC and Related
2017 NEC
Now Available!

   
Recent Posts
Industrail Control Panel bonding per 409.108
by sparkyinak
Yesterday at 06:29 PM
Calling all Non-US members!! (Non-US only)
by aussie240
12/07/16 02:39 AM
Photo Upload Tutorial
by DanK
12/06/16 11:35 PM
Sprinklered equipment 26-008
by bigpapa
12/02/16 04:24 PM
On Delay Relay with Auto Reset
by Potseal
12/01/16 09:59 AM
New in the Gallery:
12.5A through 0.75mm˛ flex (just out of curiosity)
Shout Box

Top Posters (30 Days)
gfretwell 13
HotLine1 10
sparkyinak 9
Texas_Ranger 8
Potseal 6
Who's Online
0 registered (), 186 Guests and 4 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#61529 - 01/26/06 06:23 PM current leakage
BigB Offline
Member

Registered: 03/31/04
Posts: 727
Loc: Tucson, AZ USA
Just came from an interesting service call. It was a halfway house for veterans that I have worked at before. They have a number of duplex units built in the 50's, no equipment grounds at any receptacles.

Anyway a resident complained of shocks received off the refrig. When I got there they described the shocks as a snap accompianied by a blue spark. They get them whenever they touch anything metal and also the phone and the thermostat. Well I told them it was static electricity, but I would check the fridge anyway.

Well when the fridge is running, it will light my non contact tester when held close to the cabinet. So I got my analog meter and checked from a part of the fridge that was not painted to the grounded gas line nearby. I got about 13 volts. Remember this fridge has no equipment ground with the old 2 wire system.

So now I am thinking, in addition to the static shocks, they could've gotten a real current shock off the fridge. Is the 13 volts excessive? As soon as the fridge shuts off it goes away. I told them, short of running a new circuit, the only thing to do is get a new fridge. I know if I put in a GFCI it will not hold.
I know the code requires refrigerators to be grounded, but if they can't pay for a new circuit, what else is there to do?

Top
Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades

Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades
Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades
Arc Flash Clothing, Gloves, KneePads, Tool Belts, Pouches, Tool Carriers, etc. etc....

#61530 - 01/26/06 08:33 PM Re: current leakage
gfretwell Offline

Member

Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9045
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
You are seeing the real reason refrigerators trip GFCIs. You have a short inside the compressor. If it was grounded it would quietly arc and spark inside the can in a freon bath until it finally quits.
_________________________
Greg Fretwell

Top
#61531 - 01/26/06 11:32 PM Re: current leakage
Sixer Offline
Member

Registered: 08/08/05
Posts: 264
Loc: Canada
I've run into "hot fridges" many times. Once you ground the fridge, the casing will no longer be hot. Thanks for the explanation gfretwell....I've always wondered how a compressor can have a short and energize the casing, and yet when you ground it, it not only solves the problem but the breaker doesn't trip.
_________________________
Sixer

"Will it be cheaper if I drill the holes for you?"

Top



ECN Electrical Forums - sponsored by Electrical Contractor Network - Electrical and Code Related Discussion for Electrical Contractors, Electricians, Inspectors, Instructors, Engineers and other related Professionals