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#55544 - 09/01/05 10:12 AM Is this a Feeder?
GovtVoltage Offline

Registered: 04/24/03
Posts: 20
Loc: Sudbury,MA
Is the Conductors for a Sub-Panel considered a Feeder and are we subsequently able to use Table 310.15(B)(6) to calculate our wire size?

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#55545 - 09/01/05 11:50 AM Re: Is this a Feeder?
gfretwell Offline


Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9023
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
You can only use 310.15(B)(6) if this is the feeder to the entire dwelling load, like the feeder from an outside main disconnect to the main panel inside the house. A sub panel off the main is sized with 310.16.
It has to do with load diversity.
Greg Fretwell

#55546 - 09/01/05 02:59 PM Re: Is this a Feeder?
Tom Offline

Registered: 01/01/01
Posts: 1069
Loc: Shinnston, WV USA
Table 310.15(B)(6) is one of the areas of the code that can cause a fistfight to break out. While I am in complete agreement with the post from Gfretwell, there are many parts of the country where this is not enforced this way and you would be able to use the table for your feeder. If your work is subject to inspection, it is best (as always) to consult with the AHJ prior to commencing work.

Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example.

#55547 - 09/01/05 03:21 PM Re: Is this a Feeder?
Roger Offline

Registered: 05/18/02
Posts: 1779
Loc: N.C.
I agree with Greg and Tom, 310.16


#55548 - 09/01/05 05:36 PM Re: Is this a Feeder?
GovtVoltage Offline

Registered: 04/24/03
Posts: 20
Loc: Sudbury,MA
Thanks for the reply guys......

#55549 - 09/03/05 03:53 AM Re: Is this a Feeder?
iwire Offline

Registered: 01/05/03
Posts: 4343
Loc: North Attleboro, MA USA
And I say do away with Table 310.15(B)(6) to make the NEC smaller and with less sections of confusion.

Is using 310.16 that outrageously expensive?

Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician

#55550 - 09/03/05 06:54 AM Re: Is this a Feeder?
winnie Offline

Registered: 09/15/03
Posts: 652
Loc: boston, ma
Given what copper prices are doing, every little bit helps.

On the other hand, reduced resistance in feeders means more efficient deliver of power to the load, and lower lifetime costs. If you take the 'Copper Development Association' at their word, you'd be upsizing from 310.16 by a size or two anyway.

On the left foot, I'd rather do away with 310.15, and instead change the calculations for service size to give a _separate_ result for conductor ampacity and required OCPD, in much the same way that oversized OCPD can be used with a given conductor ampacity for specific loads such as motors or welders.



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