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#54734 - 08/06/05 02:58 AM Temporary Power Hookups....  
mxslick  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 803
Atomic City, ID USA
Wanted to start a discussion on temporary power hook-ups, like those for shows and other events where a feeder is connected into a building's wiring system to feed a portable breaker box ("Distro" in showspeak.)

But any temporary where you've wondered how someone didn't get fried or buildings/equipment torched is fair game!

In my high school days, I actually put together a feeder system which worked, but was not one I would ever do again. It was for lighting of a small portable stage some friends built. The feeder was some salvaged 8/3NM Aluminum cable, one end of which terminated in a 6-position GE breaker box. The feed end was lugged to the neutral and ground busses, the phase connections were (everyone cringe here)200-amp rated battery jumper clamps!! [Linked Image] How I never managed to kill someone or burn up some feed lugs I'll never know. Ahh, the stupidity of youth!! At least I did have some common sense. I wore rated rubber gloves and had a safety observer (out of harm's way) when I hooked up / disconnected. Oh yeah, and how about the 65' of unprotected feeder strung across the floor? I obviously had the electrical gods watching over me...

A few years later, I saw another crew with a similar set-up, but no clamps. No, thier phase connections were always done hot by loosening the panel's feeder [under load!] and double-lugging. Always good for a fireworks show. That clown never wore gloves, just used a taped-up screwdriver or ratchet.

When I worked for a sound company in Nor. Cali, I was introduced to cam-loks. A wonderful device, made hookups fast and relatively safe. As long as you did them with no load on and in the right sequence. The only real problem was there seemed to be no standard for the gender of the line side feeds installed, so you had to carry a set of "turn-arounds" (or "he-he's" and "she-she's") to get your feeder to fit. The connectors were (and still are) bloody expensive though.
The idea was to make temp power safe and relatively foolproof.

But as the saying goes, make something foolproof and along comes a better fool....to illustrate:

The safe, proper proceedure to hookup is:
All distro breakers OFF [i.e., no load on feeder]
Cam-lok disconnect switch/breaker OFF [where installed, some venues didn't have disconnecting means AT the cam-lok location]
Connect feeder in sequence:
Ground;Neutral;Blue;Red;Black
Ensure all cams are fully locked and tight;
Close disconnect/breaker;
Turn on DISTRO breakers as needed.

To disconnect:

ALL DISTRO breakers OFF;
Cam-lok breaker/switch OFF;
Pull cam-loks in sequence:
Black;Red;Blue;Neutral;Ground

Well, one fine night after a great show I look across the venue to see one of our roadies crouched over by the cam-loks. I wasn't too sure what he was up to until I noticed the ground cam-lok in his hand. He was just about to pull the neutral when I let go with a tirade that would blister the pixels of your monitors!! I then made the proclamation to everyone within the greater Sacramento area that the next person to touch that feeder without my direct supervision was going to lose the use of their hands for life!! (Actually I also threatened to remove certain other body parts as well, but this is a family-friendly forum so you get the idea.)

Why was I so upset? Because this moron was about to pull the feeder with our dimmer pack connected and live, and also my monitor mixing board was still on as well!! About $75,000+ of equipment about to get a smoke test!!

After my boss heard the ruckus and realized how serious the situation was, he backed me up.

Since then, I have built my own distro for my portable projection set-up. It uses a Crouse-Hinds 3-phase panel (My large Xenon lamp rectifier needs 3-phase power) and connects with feeder lines (#2 cable, 5 wire.) I can power my entire set-up, including sound, from this one distro. All feeder ends are bare, I lug to the ground and neutral, and pull phase power from a circuit breaker (100amp max) in the panel. So far, I've not run into situations where I've needed cam-loks or didn't have the breaker space available.

I originally built this set-up for an outdoor show I used to do, I'd rent a 55kw quiet genny to run the rig, and connect to the genny. Oh what fun to drive the ground rod for the genny, then have to pull it when we were done!

I would bond the neutral and ground at the genny, but it seemed that depending on who I asked, I wasn't supposed to. But the L-N voltages were always stable and I had no equipment or audio noise problems. Hmmm...that cuold make a whole 'nother thread...

So let's hear it from you folks.... [Linked Image]


Stupid should be painful.

Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades

#54735 - 08/06/05 09:02 AM Re: Temporary Power Hookups....  
iwire  Offline
Moderator
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,391
North Attleboro, MA USA
First on the genny set up.

It must be bonded!

I assume you distro main is unbonded as well.

Left unbonded you do not have a fault path from the EGC back to the source. This is dangerous and an NEC violation.

Without the bonding you might as well leave the equipment grounding conductors unconnected!

Second, should you be making your own distribution rig and opening panel covers at the venues to tie it in hot??

In my state you would need an electrical license to be installing equipment into panels.

Cam-locs are fine when used in trained hands.

The NEC does have rules about the use of these devices.

Quote
520.53(K) Single-Pole Separable Connectors. Where single-pole portable cable connectors are used, they shall be listed and of the locking type. Sections 400.10, 406.6, and 406.7 shall not apply to listed single-pole separable connectors and single-conductor cable assemblies utilizing listed single-pole separable connectors. Where paralleled sets of current-carrying, single-pole separable connectors are provided as input devices, they shall be prominently labeled with a warning indicating the presence of internal parallel connections. The use of single-pole separable connectors shall comply with at least one of the following conditions:

(1)Connection and disconnection of connectors are only possible where the supply connectors are interlocked to the source and it is not possible to connect or disconnect connectors when the supply is energized.

(2)Line connectors are of the listed sequential-interlocking type so that load connectors shall be connected in the following sequence:

a.Equipment grounding conductor connection

b.Grounded circuit conductor connection, if provided

c.Ungrounded conductor connection, and that disconnection shall be in the reverse order

(3)A caution notice shall be provided adjacent to the line connectors indicating that plug connection shall be in the following order:

a.Equipment grounding conductor connectors

b.Grounded circuit conductor connectors, if provided

c.Ungrounded conductor connectors, and that disconnection shall be in the reverse order


Bob


[This message has been edited by iwire (edited 08-06-2005).]


Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

#54736 - 08/06/05 03:34 PM Re: Temporary Power Hookups....  
mxslick  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 803
Atomic City, ID USA
Bob:

On the genny, I thought I was right. Glad to see someone with more experience confirming that. It makes a lot of sense in any event to bond. (The conflicting advice was coming from the genny rental folks, BTW.)

Yes, the neutrals and EGC's are isolated in my distro panel.

Building of distros is very common practice in the entertainment biz, I've seen some which deserve Oscars(r) for quality of build (electronic volt/amp meters for each phase, Indicators for correct hookup, all breakers/recepts identified with custom permanent labels, hospital-grade recepts, etc.) and others which I wouldn't let my worst enemy hook up. (Resi loadcenters with 4s boxes offset nippled to the concentric ko's, NO backboard, feeders made with welding cable (not listed for feeder use) with brittle/cracked insulation. [Linked Image]

As for the tie-ins, IF the breaker (or disconnect switch) was already installed, yes I do my own tie-ins. I don't like to, but sometimes I have to. Although a lot of venues have their own electricians, then they tie in. My days of live lugging are long gone.

Unfortunately, it seems that Art. 520-53(k) is unheard of in most of the venues I've worked in the past. Subsections (1) and (2) don't fit with the cam-loks I've used, and subsection (3) was never posted at any place I've been. But our company had the proceedure as I'd outlined in my first post made into a laminated card which was attached to the distro and feeder cam-lok end. (Because of the near miss we'd had.)

I'm wondering since the title of Art 520 is "Theaters, Audience Areas Of Motion Picture And Television Studios, Etc." (NEC 1999) would it be possible that ceretain jurisdictions/AHJ's are under the impression that it does not apply to concert halls, stages, etc?

Art. 530 may be what they have in mind? Art. 530-22(a) reads almost exactly the same as 520-53(k). Hmmm.....

[This message has been edited by mxslick (edited 08-06-2005).]


Stupid should be painful.

#54737 - 08/06/05 07:25 PM Re: Temporary Power Hookups....  
techie  Offline
Member
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 246
palo alto, ca usa
It's worth noting that 520.53(k) is relatively new, having appeared sometime in the last 15 years. For the most part, people were already using cam-locks by that point, as tweco's were already outlawed as unsafe in most jurisdictions.
The newer single conductor cables (type G and W) didn't start appearing until about 15 years ago, prior to which welding cable was the de-facto standard. I have not heard any reports of problems with the use of welding cable, other than the fact that the AHJ's in some areas didn't like it. In some areas, there is still a lot of welding cable in use, simply because of the large inventory already in service. The main reason that welding cable was banned was the lack of a double jacket.

The other popular cables are 2/4 and 2/5 SO, either with cam-locks, or one of several types of pin-and-sleeve type connectors.
Some folks use 6/4 with 50amp 120/250v twistlocks.

I will note that the code limits the number of mated connector pairs in any cable run so as to effectively require the use of 100' sections of cable. We commonly ignore that requirement, due to the inability of a single stagehand to carry a 100' section of 2/5 SO or 4/0 type W by himself. (I can and do carry 50' sections by myself when needed. It's heavy, but it can be done, and I'm 5'11 130lbs... the cable weighs almost as much as I do.)

Every cam-lock rig I've seen had the phases on females on the line side. Some systems reverse the ground and/or neutral to prevent mixing them up, but I prefer to have them all the same direction.. It's no fun having to pull one or two cables out of a run, and re-run them so that the connectors match up, just because the grunts pulling the wire were not paying attention, or didn't know what config the rig was in. (which may not have even come off the truck yet.)
So, you end up carrying gender benders, but of course, you never have enough of the correct ones when you need them, or you find that the local crew snagged some at the last stop on the tour.
Thats why most rigs will carry their own feeder cable, with tails, so that all they need is bare lugs to tie into.

Our generator vendor provides motion-picture grade (quiet, crystal synced) gensets, and ground and neutral are tied together inside the generator.

We seldom drive a ground rod, since a lot of our use is on concrete, where there is no place available to drive it, and the generator ends up being completely isolated from ground.

Inside, I use the house ground if it is clean, but sometimes we end up grounding to a cold water pipe (standpipe is preferred). Modern dimmers are much better than they used to be, bit some of the old ones could send a lot of hash back on to the power feed.

I've also done shows where we would bring in a portable transformer, and take a 480v feed from the house, and drop it to 120/208 for our rig.

For onstage distro, you see a lot of L21-30 and L21-20 5 wire stringers, with individual circuits broken out every 5-10 feet, or L14-30 and L14-20 4 wire, and L5-20 and L5-30 single circuit cables.


#54738 - 08/08/05 06:22 AM Re: Temporary Power Hookups....  
iwire  Offline
Moderator
Joined: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,391
North Attleboro, MA USA
Hey slick and techie whats up?

Let me tell you a little of my experience.

I have been the house electrician for a venue with indoor concerts of about 5000 and outdoor shows of about 8,000 to 10,000.

We had acts ranging from the typical local 'cover bands' to well established acts like Chili Peppers, Pearl Jam, Scorpions etc.

Now I am actively involved in a 20,000 seat 'shed' with acts from Ozzy to Reba M.

I have seen quite a range of equipment, some very impressive some down right dangerous.

Quote
Building of distros is very common practice in the entertainment biz,


I agree, that has nothing to do with the question of if it is legal or not.

Quote
I'm wondering since the title of Art 520 is "Theaters, Audience Areas Of Motion Picture And Television Studios, Etc." (NEC 1999) would it be possible that ceretain jurisdictions/AHJ's are under the impression that it does not apply to concert halls, stages, etc?

Art. 530 may be what they have in mind? Art. 530-22(a) reads almost exactly the same as 520-53(k). Hmmm.....


I can not say what AHJs are thinking but if we look at the scope 520 is the article that applies to most touring shows.

Quote
520.1 Scope.
This article covers all buildings or that part of a building or structure, indoor or outdoor, designed or used for presentation, dramatic, musical, motion picture projection, or similar purposes and to specific audience seating areas within motion picture or television studios.


Now look at the scope of 530

Quote
530.1 Scope.
The requirements of this article shall apply to television studios and motion picture studios using either film or electronic cameras, except as provided in 520.1, and exchanges, factories, laboratories, stages, or a portion of the building in which film or tape more than 22 mm (7/8 in.) in width is exposed, developed, printed, cut, edited, rewound, repaired, or stored.


Unless you are making movies I feel 520 is the article to look at.

Quote
I will note that the code limits the number of mated connector pairs in any cable run so as to effectively require the use of 100' sections of cable. We commonly ignore that requirement, due to the inability of a single stagehand to carry a 100' section of 2/5 SO or 4/0 type W by himself.


That statement and this one also

Quote
We seldom drive a ground rod, since a lot of our use is on concrete, where there is no place available to drive it, and the generator ends up being completely isolated from ground.


show the problems I have with 'roadies' or 'theater electricians' many are very knowledgeable about the equipment they deal with. However they either do not know the code or simple ignore it when it is difficult to comply with the excuse being 'we always do that'.

The NEC does not care if it takes two stage hands to carry the cable or if you have to drill a hole in concrete to get a rod in.

By the way if the all the equipment is cord and plug connected to the generator you do not need a ground rod. If the generator is hard wired you must ground the unit concrete or not.

Quote
I've also done shows where we would bring in a portable transformer, and take a 480v feed from the house, and drop it to 120/208 for our rig.


That portable transformer better be bonded and have GECs run to building steel or a rod.

I feel strongly about this subject and I will tell you why.

Most of these venues are also covered by ARTICLE 518 Places of Assembly which has very stringent requirements to protect the audience. If you have road crews ignoring the NEC you are putting the audience in danger.

Bob




[This message has been edited by iwire (edited 08-08-2005).]


Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

#54739 - 08/09/05 05:55 AM Re: Temporary Power Hookups....  
techie  Offline
Member
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 246
palo alto, ca usa
Quote
<<I will note that the code limits the number of mated connector pairs in any cable run so as to effectively require the use of 100' sections of cable. We commonly ignore that requirement, due to the inability of a single stagehand to carry a 100' section of 2/5 SO or 4/0 type W by himself.>>

That statement and this one also

<<We seldom drive a ground rod, since a lot of our use is on concrete, where there is no place available to drive it, and the generator ends up being completely isolated from ground.>>

show the problems I have with 'roadies' or 'theater electricians' many are very knowledgeable about the equipment they deal with. However they either do not know the code or simple ignore it when it is difficult to comply with the excuse being 'we always do that'.

The NEC does not care if it takes two stage hands to carry the cable or if you have to drill a hole in concrete to get a rod in.


My problem is that sometimes it seems like the people who make that rules, seem to be out of touch with reality, and don't consult with the guys in the field who are supposed to follow them. What works on Broadway, or in stadiums, dosen't always work everywhere else.

I don't see any compelling reason for that particular rule to exist. I can see not wanting to have an endless string of 20' cables, but I think they should have allowed for 50' lengths, since going beyond 50' stresses the physical limits of the people handling the cable.

Sometimes I simply don't have a second person to help me carry that 100' feeder, and there is no way I am going to be able to handle it by myself without injury.

Sometime I can wheel the cable in/on a roadbox, but sometimes I have to hump it up hillsides, or stairs, or other places where I can't use wheels.

Given a choice between saving my back, and following an arbitrary rule, I will always choose to save my back. Having connectors every 50' instead of every 100' is not going to hurt anybody, and it will save personel from unnecessary injury.

One of the shops that I used to work for only had about 400' of feeder in our inventory, and it was all in 50' lengths. Our generator vendor supplies 50' lengths because they can be delivered by a single driver. Another shop had mostly 50' lengths, with a few 250' lengths in boxes when needed. The 250's were ok as long as you could use the wheeled box, but trying to run the cable without the box was painful.

I frequently didn't know how much feeder I am going to need, or where it is going to go, until I get onsite. Sometimes I need 20', sometimes I need 400'. Sometimes I need to drop another distro somewhere in the middle of the run, or need to split that feeder into two locations, either splitting off a single supply, or in completely separate locations.


Quote

By the way if the all the equipment is cord and plug connected to the generator you do not need a ground rod. If the generator is hard wired you must ground the unit concrete or not.


Everything is cam-locks, to portable Distro panels.. the question is, does cord and plug imply a single connector?

The generator is on rubber tires, and we rest the foot on wood blocks. Everything is grounded back to the generator, but nothing is grounded to earth.

The situation gets even more complicated when you don't know where the generator is going to end up until you get onsite, and the generator dosen't arrive until a couple hours prior to showtime. Even if I had a jackhammer or drill to punch thru the concrete, I don't have enough lead time to get USA out to clear the underground utilities, and I'm not going to start randomly driving ground rods with the knowledge that there are 12kv, gas, water, sewer, steam, and telecom lines somewhere under my feet.
Next day response dosen't help if the event is already over by the time they get there.

It's one thing if there is already a tent set up there, and the tent crew has driven their stakes. Then I can drive a ground rod next to their stakes, and feel reasonably safe.

If I can, I'll clamp a ground to a water pipe if available, but most of the time, I don't even have that luxury..

It's a classic catch-22.. you're dammed if you do, and dammed if you don't.

Quote

<<I've also done shows where we would bring in a portable transformer, and take a 480v feed from the house, and drop it to 120/208 for our rig.>>

That portable transformer better be bonded and have GECs run to building steel or a rod.


I agree completely.

I can think of two locations where we used a transformer.
One was in a gym, and we grounded to to ground bus in the distro panel that we were tapping from.

The other was an outdoor ship building ramp, and we bonded to the conduit and GEC in the box that we tapped from, which had been installed specificly for our use.


#54740 - 08/09/05 10:03 AM Re: Temporary Power Hookups....  
mvrandazzo  Offline
Member
Joined: May 2002
Posts: 110
Great Topic,
Has anyone used the "Hubbell Spider" or "Leviton The Box"? I found this to be handy when distributing to multiple locations. They have built-in GFCI's. One limitation is they are only single phase. This made it hard to distribute three circuit on one stringer. Our venue was on a parking garage that was total concrete. The generators were located a few levels below the event and the feeders were run up to 4 distribution "Spiders". There was no place to bond. No structural steel. The boxes worked well. After a soaking thunderstorm before the event, GFCI's were popping left and right. Homemade cordsets using 1900 boxes hold more water than you might think. We made our own stringers using 5 conductor #10 and alternating 2 circuits every 50' using Woodhead boxes. I have considered building a 3 phase distro using twist-locks for 3 phase stringers and GFCI breakers. This would give me more capacity per stringer.

Blessings,
Mark


#54741 - 08/09/05 05:01 PM Re: Temporary Power Hookups....  
mxslick  Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 2004
Posts: 803
Atomic City, ID USA
iwire wrote:

Quote
I can not say what AHJs are thinking but if we look at the scope 520 is the article that applies to most touring shows.

<<520.1 Scope.
This article covers all buildings or that part of a building or structure, indoor or outdoor, designed or used for presentation, dramatic, musical, motion picture projection, or similar purposes and to specific audience seating areas within motion picture or television studios.>> {BOLD emphasis is mine}


The 1999 edition of the NEC does not include the "indoor or outdoor" reference. I would presume earlier editions also do not. So that could be where the mindset originates. I'm not saying it's right, but if it's not pointed out, well....

In reference to my comment that building of distros was common practice:

Quote
I agree, that has nothing to do with the question of if it is legal or not.


THe '99 NEC seems to allow this, based on ART. 520-62:

Quote
520-62 Portable Power Distribution Units
Portable power distribution units shall comply with (a) through (e).

(a) Enclosure The construction shall be such that no current-carrying part will be exposed.

(b) Receptacles and Overcurrent Protection Receptacles shall comply with Section 520-45 and shall have branch circuit overcurrent protection in the box. Fuses and circuit breakers shall be protected against physical damage. Cords or cables supplying pendant recptacles shall be listed for extra-hard usage.

(c) Busbars and Terminals Busbars shall have an ampacity equal to the sum of the ampere ratings of all the circuits connected to the busbar. Lugs shall be provided for the connection of the master cable.

(d) Flanged surface inlets Flanged surface inlets(recessed plugs) that are used to accept the power shall be rated in amperes.

(e) Cable Arrangement Cables shall be adequately protected where they pass through enclosures and be arranged so that tension on the cable will not be transmitted to the terminations.


I would think that most distros would be readily in compliance with those provisions, merely because any touring company worth more than a nickle knows that safe, reliable power is crucial. Most performers won't work again with any company that has equipment breakdowns during a show.


Quote
I frequently didn't know how much feeder I am going to need, or where it is going to go, until I get onsite. Sometimes I need 20', sometimes I need 400'. Sometimes I need to drop another distro somewhere in the middle of the run, or need to split that feeder into two locations, either splitting off a single supply, or in completely separate locations.


Art. 520-53(4)(j) specifies the number of interconnects allowed and the maximum distance from supply to switchboard of 100 feet. (No more than 3 interconnects up to 100ft, then allows one additional interconnect for each additional 100ft.) Again, I'm looking at 199 NEC. Did 2005 change this? And this article seems to apply only to "Portable Switchboards On Stage". The above Art. 520-62 appears under the subsection (E) "Portabe Stage Equipment Other Than Switchboards". I submit the postion that the limitation on distro feeder lenghts and allowable number of disconnects does not fall under the limits in Art. 520-53(4)(j)......

Also, I would think that coiling up an excess length of feeder would be a very bad idea due to heating and inductance.

As someone here once asked in another thread "The NFPA is a tombstone agency. How many deaths can be attributed to...." So how many injuries/deaths are attributed to multiple connectors in a distro feeder? In other words, has historical usage proven it to be an inherently unsafe practice?

Quote
By the way if the all the equipment is cord and plug connected to the generator you do not need a ground rod. If the generator is hard wired you must ground the unit concrete or not.


Now I'm confused here. What difference (electrically) would the connection means make? (Let's not debate the bond to structure created by a metallic conduit, for example). I would think a ground rod is a good idea, regardless. This was demonstrated by a real incident.

A big name performer came into our venue located by a lake. (He currently shills for a casino in So. Cal.) His lighting rig was stadium-size, with a lot of the Vari-lites (those moving, color changing spotlights you see all the time.)

They brought in thier own genny to power the lighting rig. (House power was only 200 amp, 3phase.) The rack with the control computer was connected to house power via a grounded outlet.

Shortly after firing up the genny, we could smell the lovely odor of burning electronics, but could not locate where it was coming from. It seemed strongest in the middle of the house (?) which was well away from any gear. (??) After some searching, I pinpointed the smell to the Power conditioner in the computer rack. I told their tech, and we shut down and opened the power conditioner up. The N-GND MOV's were totally fried!! We were both puzzled. I then suggested we plug the rack in with a ground lift so I could meter the voltage from the rack to ground. What did we find? 180+ volts!! Connecting directly to the wall (no lift) and using the other half of the duplex we still got around 90 volts G-N. WTF?? Unplug the rack and G-N dropped to about 1 volt! Double WTF??

I suggested that the genny and "shore power" ground obviously was not bonded together, creating the difference. And that maybe they should power the computer rack from the genny to stop the problem.

The know-it-all tech said no way, it'll work for the show just like it is, no big deal.

Well during the show, they lost five! of the vari-lite interface boxes, two down in flames, two with a lot of smoke and one which knocked the roadie on his butt when he went to change it. (This in addition to the three boxes lost during the day.)

What caused all this carnage? I went outside to look closely at the genny, followed the ground lead to find IT WAS JUST THROWN INTO THE LAKE!!

Did I mention the hookup was done by the same know-it-all?

I talked to the resort's sparky and asked him if we could drive a "permanent" ground rod to prevent this happening again. (The gennys all ended up in the same location, so I thought it was a good idea. Or at the least, that the genny be grounded to the ground lug in the lighting disconnect (although looking back now, I don't think that would be legal.)

As I'm sure iwire and techie can attest, there are so many variables involved in setting up at different venues, each one is unique and sometimes even a familiar venue changes in ways that throw a wrench into the best-laid plans.

The most important thing is to work safe, ensure reliable power for your client and maintain high safety standards to protect workers, performers and the public.

Whew, that was a marathon post.... [Linked Image]

edited to fix html
third time's the charm [Linked Image]
[This message has been edited by mxslick (edited 08-09-2005).]

[This message has been edited by mxslick (edited 08-09-2005).]

[This message has been edited by mxslick (edited 08-09-2005).]


Stupid should be painful.

#54742 - 08/09/05 09:15 PM Re: Temporary Power Hookups....  
ShockMe77  Offline
Member
Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 821
Rahway, New Jersey
I have been the house electrician for a venue with indoor concerts of about 5000 and outdoor shows of about 8,000 to 10,000.

We had acts ranging from the typical local 'cover bands' to well established acts like Chili Peppers, Pearl Jam, Scorpions etc.

Now I am actively involved in a 20,000 seat 'shed' with acts from Ozzy to Reba M.


Bob, that's awesome. I'm a hard rock music fan and could definitely see myself one day getting into that type of work on a part-time basis. I dunno, first I have to work on passing the test and getting licensed before I even think about that kind of stuff.


#54743 - 08/10/05 12:23 AM Re: Temporary Power Hookups....  
Av-guy  Offline
Member
Joined: Dec 2004
Posts: 23
Bangkok,Thailand
In Thailand we use 230/400V for power. I use to do sound for my university band. The distro we use is fitted with IEC60309connectors and we draw around 30A peak; It's easy for me to connect all that wire all at once. BTW, anytime I coil my feeder(3*6 sq.mm.) I think of someone coiling 400 feet of 0000 (120sq.mm.) three phase feeder in a cold night without helpers. Oh,how painful [Linked Image]


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