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#47905 - 01/29/05 01:57 PM Fixture wire connections
Norstarr Offline

Registered: 09/25/04
Posts: 89
Loc: Wi
Does anybody know the thought behind the ul label on light fixtures requiring supply connections to be rated for at least 90 degrees? I know that it does not pertain to the wiring in the box mounted in the ceiling due to a code seminar I attended many many years ago but I do not remember the exact meaning for it. Does it apply to the wires connected to the sockets or what?

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#47906 - 01/29/05 03:40 PM Re: Fixture wire connections
renosteinke Offline
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Registered: 01/22/05
Posts: 5305
Loc: Blue Collar Country
The specification does, in fact, apply to the wires within the connection box.
When UL tests a fixture, temperature measurements are an important part of the testing. Where there might be a problem, UL will require that wires in the area be of a certain insulation, the fixture be marked "Not for use inside residences," etc.

Ordinary THHN qualifies as 90 degree wire, so there's not a problem. What do you do if the requirement is for, say, 105 degree wire? Well, you end up having another j-box a couple feet away, and running the expensive hi-temp wire those last few feet.


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