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#37029 - 04/20/04 11:43 AM What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
Haligan Offline
Member

Registered: 02/25/04
Posts: 112
Loc: Berkeley, CA USA
I'm studying the Code dilligently and come across the 'line to neutral load' reference frequently. And I understand that fine.

What are examples of non- line to neutral loads? AC has to have return current.

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#37030 - 04/20/04 11:49 AM Re: What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
cpalm1 Offline
Member

Registered: 01/06/04
Posts: 62
in the U.S., 220 volt circuits would be an example of non-line to neutral loads. 220 is a line to line load.

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#37031 - 04/20/04 12:08 PM Re: What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
CTwireman Offline
Member

Registered: 02/07/02
Posts: 839
Loc: Connecticut, USA
cpalm1,

You are correct. However, "220" volts is an amateur term (IMHO) and should not be used.

Peter
_________________________
Peter

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#37032 - 04/20/04 12:42 PM Re: What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
iwire Offline
Moderator

Registered: 01/05/03
Posts: 4343
Loc: North Attleboro, MA USA
I hear you Peter but perhaps cpalm1 is from outside the US judging from his post.

Here are the 'Standard' voltages.

120, 120/240, 208Y/120, 240, 347, 480Y/277, 480, 600Y/347, and 600 volts shall be used.

208. 240, 480, and 600 are all line to line voltages.

I have only run into 347 once, and that was feeder for some sound equipment strangely enough.
_________________________
Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

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#37033 - 04/20/04 12:53 PM Re: What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
Edward Offline
Member

Registered: 12/14/02
Posts: 309
Loc: California
Haligan,
where are you studying the code? At home or you are taking a code class?

Edward
_________________________
Thanks
Edward

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#37034 - 04/20/04 12:58 PM Re: What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
GETELECTRIC Offline
Member

Registered: 10/22/03
Posts: 178
Loc: toronto canada
Just for information Canada primarily uses 600/347v.(ltg,motors etc.), very little 480/277 unless we get American equipment

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#37035 - 04/20/04 01:50 PM Re: What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
Haligan Offline
Member

Registered: 02/25/04
Posts: 112
Loc: Berkeley, CA USA
Edward-

I'm studying at home. In rainy California.

The answer to this question answered part of another issue I've been scratching my head about.

On line-line loads such as 240 mentioned, I understand here is a potential difference of 240v between both ungrounded conductors, and 120v potential between each ungrounded and grounded. So where is the return path for the current. None of my books go that deep into it. I'm guessing it's going throught the groundING conductor.

Example- You lose the neutral on a multiwire circuit. You end up with 240v. Where is the return path?

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#37036 - 04/20/04 02:00 PM Re: What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
iwire Offline
Moderator

Registered: 01/05/03
Posts: 4343
Loc: North Attleboro, MA USA
Take a look at the first schematic on
the left.

It shows a 480 volt primary 240/120 secondary transformer.



Between the two outside wires you
have 240, between one outside wire
and the center (the neutral) you
will have 120.

The return path for 240 is simply
the other conductor, by the way we
really do not want to call it a
return path as we are talking about alternating current.

This transformer has grounding
connections shown and that is fine
but grounding has nothing to do with operating equipment.

Grounding has to do with safety but
the circuits will work without
grounding connections.

Bob



[This message has been edited by iwire (edited 04-20-2004).]
_________________________
Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

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#37037 - 04/20/04 02:56 PM Re: What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
Ryan_J Offline
Moderator

Registered: 08/19/03
Posts: 1355
Loc: West Jordan, Utah, USA
Bob: When I first saw your post I thought you were writing poetry about transformers.

And I thought I was sick...!
_________________________
Ryan Jackson,
Salt Lake City

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#37038 - 04/20/04 03:24 PM Re: What are Non-'Line to neutral' loads?
iwire Offline
Moderator

Registered: 01/05/03
Posts: 4343
Loc: North Attleboro, MA USA
 Quote:
Bob: When I first saw your post I
thought you were writing poetry.


Yeah that will happen, I am one of those
Neanderthal, simple, shallow guys.

[img]http://rds.yahoo.com/S=96062883/K=Neanderthal/v=2/l=IVI/*-[/img]

I am by no means a poetry writer.
_________________________
Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

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