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#29685 - 09/22/03 12:26 PM Electricians' scissors and hammers?
SvenNYC Offline
Member

Registered: 08/19/02
Posts: 1685
Loc: New York City
Stopped by a neighborhood hardware store after lunch.

Saw a pair of scissors labelled by Klein as "Electrician's Scissors". They also were selling a stripping knife (with a short stumpy blade). Never seen one of those before...didn't think they still made that, what with all the spring-loaded stripping tools we have these days.

What was the scissor used for and how did it differ from conventional household scissors?

Klein's website showed two types: One with stripping notches and one that was a plain ol' scissor.

What about the "electrician's hammer"? How is this any different from a regular carpenter's claw hammer? The picture on Klein's website showed one....and it looked like a regular hammer to the untrained eye.

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#29686 - 09/22/03 01:53 PM Re: Electricians' scissors and hammers?
DougW Offline
Member

Registered: 06/08/03
Posts: 1083
Loc: North Chicago, IL
Scissors most likely had two small notches for stripping insulation.

Short stubby knife (looks like one of those snap-off blade jobs - without the snap offs) is for cutting cable insulation

Electrician's hammer has a longer poll (the "neck" between the striking face and the body) to allow it to reach into deep boxes - most carpenter's hammers would catch the edge of the box.

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#29687 - 09/22/03 03:08 PM Re: Electricians' scissors and hammers?
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
I have a pair of electrician's scissors that I got from Jensen Tools some years ago.

They do indeed have a couple of stripping notches on them, not that I use them. The main blades are quite useful for trimming the cotton and nylon fillers used in some cords.

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#29688 - 09/22/03 03:15 PM Re: Electricians' scissors and hammers?
gunther Offline
Member

Registered: 09/17/03
Posts: 59
I'm just winging it but I think the scissors might have been for low voltage work. It seems like the data guys always carried them. What size wire were the stipping holes for?
As far as an electrician's hammer, I always thought it was defined by the straight claw on the back instead of the curved nail puller. I know its good for something that I have used it for before but right now that escapes me. I'll have to check out the poll on mine.

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#29689 - 09/22/03 03:15 PM Re: Electricians' scissors and hammers?
Bjarney Offline
Moderator

Registered: 04/10/02
Posts: 2561
Loc: West-Southern Inner-Northeast ...
Splicer's scissors {Klein 2100} have serrated blades and are intended to cut up to 19AWG 'PIC' (plastic-insulated conductor) cable.

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#29690 - 09/22/03 03:33 PM Re: Electricians' scissors and hammers?
iwire Offline
Moderator

Registered: 01/05/03
Posts: 4343
Loc: North Attleboro, MA USA
The electricians hammer has the straight claw as Gunther said and the longer striking head as Doug said to reach into boxes.

The bad side is this makes the whole hammer head very long and difficult to swing between joists if you need to for staples.

Bob
_________________________
Bob Badger
Construction & Maintenance Electrician
Massachusetts

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#29691 - 09/22/03 04:19 PM Re: Electricians' scissors and hammers?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Has anyone used the lineman's knife he is referring to? I see them at the supply house and I've wondered if they would be easier (and safer) to use than a regular pocket knife on big cable. I've had a couple close calls with my pocket knife.
Brian

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#29692 - 09/22/03 04:35 PM Re: Electricians' scissors and hammers?
gunther Offline
Member

Registered: 09/17/03
Posts: 59
Is that the knife with the hooked end? I got one with my original tool set and did use it on stripping the end of bigger cable. When I say stripping I mean in a penciling fashion, being careful not to nick the wire. These days about the only knife I carry is a razor knife, but I did get a mean look when an old fart asked me for my pocket knife and I told him I didn't have one on me. All in all, the hooked knife was really more useful to me than a regular knife. I think it had to do with maybe the thick and wide blade and being easy to push. Also the hook came in handy occaisionally.

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#29693 - 09/22/03 04:57 PM Re: Electricians' scissors and hammers?
sparky Offline
Member

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
yes Brian, i've used the klien 'linesman's knife' to strip and make onto OH drops.

one less potiential point of contact...

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#29694 - 09/22/03 05:31 PM Re: Electricians' scissors and hammers?
ThinkGood Offline
Member

Registered: 08/07/02
Posts: 1084
Loc: Milwaukee, WI
Lineman's Knife:


Electrician's Scissors (with notches):


Cable Splicer's Knife:

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