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#23702 - 03/25/03 05:35 PM Breakers
LuminateME1 Offline

Registered: 03/06/03
Posts: 25
Loc: Seattle,WA,USA
What's the difference:

Twin breakers vs 220 breakers---is it that one has a two plug-in ports?????? Please be specific is possible.


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#23703 - 03/25/03 05:58 PM Re: Breakers
harold endean Offline

Registered: 02/16/02
Posts: 2248
Loc: Boonton, NJ
A 220 volt breaker is two breakers tied together with one tie handle. It bridges across both bus bars to allow 220 volts to pass through it.
A twin breaker is two breakers that fits in the sapce of a single breaker. There is 2 handles for two independent operated 110 volt breakers. These breakers are called, twins, half sized, or mini breakers. Sometimes they are used a cheater breakers. There is an exception where you can tie two twins together to get 220 volts.
When you install a twin breaker in a 20/20 panel, you can get 40 circuits in a 20 circuit panel. That is not allowed as per the manufactures instructions or as per sec. 110-3(b) of the NEC.

#23704 - 03/25/03 06:06 PM Re: Breakers
HotLine1 Offline


Registered: 04/03/02
Posts: 6792
Loc: Brick, NJ USA
A "twin" breaker provides two (2) circuits from one (1) buss space; both at 120 volts to neutral. There is one (1) physical connection to the panel buss. They are also refered to as "piggybacks" and "tandem"

A common use of the above is to "add" additional circuit capacity to a "full" panel. The design intent was/is to provide a greater circuit capacity in a physically "smaller" cb panel. (See yoyr 20/20-24/4- post)

A "220" breaker, as you have referred to it, is a "two pole" breaker. It is basically two single pole, full size breakers with a common handle & trip. This breaker connects to two buss spaces, and provides 220 volts (or 240, or 208).

There are also some "twin" 2 pole breakers around, but that will really add to your confusion.

Hopefully this breif explanation helps you!


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