The Electrical Contractor Network

ECN Electrical Forum
Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals

Books, Tools and Test Equipment for Electrical and Construction Trades

   
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#211491 - 10/20/13 12:15 AM EMT question
gfretwell Offline


Member
Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9066
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
I am in the middle of another project and I was thinking about using a raceway system but I am stumped about how the Chicago guys get EMT in a wall going through a number of studs. Do they just feed everything down through the top. That will not work here so I think it is good old Romex for me.
_________________________
Greg Fretwell
Top
Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades
#211492 - 10/20/13 12:25 AM Re: EMT question [Re: gfretwell]
sparkyinak Offline
Member
Registered: 07/08/07
Posts: 1309
Loc: Alaska
Not a Chicago guy but what a do is avoid horizontal runs much as possible. When I had to go horizontal, I'd go through wish a piece of scrap wood that was cut to the height I am going to run horizontally. I'd then go through with a circular saw and make a cut ONG mark and about an inch higher the cut would be just deep enough for the conduit. I'd then go through with my hammer and pop out the piece of wood between the cuts. I would use nail plates to secure the conduit in place.

It sounds labor intensive but if done right, it's quicker then a hole hog and don't have to wrestle the comduit in place.
_________________________
"Live Awesome!" - Kevin Carosa
Top
#211493 - 10/20/13 02:07 AM Re: EMT question [Re: gfretwell]
togol Offline
Member
Registered: 09/15/05
Posts: 426
Loc: NW In. USA
not all from the top, I drilled the first hole at a slight angle to help me get started, and then just fought it in using the bender at times to nose it in to the next hole. Door openings made it easier too, and I would make some bends once the pipe was in the wall.

1/2" goes in pretty easy… 3/4 not so much, would have to drill a couple holes in the first couple studs to start


Edited by togol (10/20/13 02:08 AM)
_________________________
Tom
Top
#211494 - 10/20/13 07:05 AM Re: EMT question [Re: gfretwell]
ghost307 Offline
Member
Registered: 05/09/05
Posts: 897
Loc: Chicago Illinois USA
I'm afraid that Sparky's approach would get gigged here. I've seen it tried but it always gets a red tag. It's a perfectly good way to get the conduit in place and protected, but it weakens the studs too much to make the framing inspector happy.

When I'm doing new construction I either run the conduit horizontally before the doors are framed so I can stick in a long piece of EMT, drop down through the top plate before the roof deck goes on, or wiggle shorter (36") pieces into the holes I drilled in the studs and used more couplings than normal.

If you're installing a metal raceway in existing construction, you might also want to see if your local Code allows FMT. You get the advantages of EMT but it's much easier to put in.

Best of luck to you.
_________________________
Ghost307
Top
#211495 - 10/20/13 09:11 AM Re: EMT question [Re: gfretwell]
gfretwell Offline


Member
Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9066
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
I have talked myself out of it. The studs are CaC PT lumber and I bet they will eat EMT and metal boxes. I think it has to be plastic all the way. I am even wondering if it will eat the nailer plates, although once the sheathing is up, the nailer plates are not as important.

Does anyone have practical experience with .15 CaC? Are all the fears justified?
_________________________
Greg Fretwell
Top
#211496 - 10/20/13 11:16 AM Re: EMT question [Re: gfretwell]
togol Offline
Member
Registered: 09/15/05
Posts: 426
Loc: NW In. USA
Agree, EMT with any PT lumber is a bad idea, probably due to the copper in the preservative. Simpson recommends stainless hardware and fasteners even when the wood will be dry since there could be corrosive elements on the surface of some wood products.

316 S/S would be best where you live, while 305/306 works well at marinas up here,
_________________________
Tom
Top
#211497 - 10/20/13 12:04 PM Re: EMT question [Re: gfretwell]
gfretwell Offline


Member
Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9066
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
I am going to do a little science fair project to quantify the PT thing.
I am going to get a bunch of scraps from by project and put a variety of fasteners, Simpson clips and such in them, toss it out behind the shed and look at it in a year or two.

Of particular interest to me are the "hot dipped galvanized" gun nails I have a box of. They are supposed to be OK in the new PT but I am skeptical.

I am using Trex blocks anywhere that metal would touch the PT, just to be on the safe side. Aluminum seems to be the worst. That rules out Bell boxes.
_________________________
Greg Fretwell
Top
#211498 - 10/20/13 12:09 PM Re: EMT question [Re: ghost307]
sparkyinak Offline
Member
Registered: 07/08/07
Posts: 1309
Loc: Alaska
Ill reference it but I do believe the building codes are no more than 25% of the cross section of a load bearing stud and 40% of a non bearing wall joist can be notched or board. Granted local JHA can trump that. I also should have mentioned to make sure by doing what I describe will clear inspection first

PT wood is a whole different ball game


Edited by sparkyinak (10/20/13 12:11 PM)
_________________________
"Live Awesome!" - Kevin Carosa
Top
#211499 - 10/20/13 12:57 PM Re: EMT question [Re: sparkyinak]
sparkyinak Offline
Member
Registered: 07/08/07
Posts: 1309
Loc: Alaska
Fron the International Residential Code:

R602.6 Drilling and notching of studs. Drilling and notching of studs shall be in accordance with the following:
1. Notching. Any stud in an exterior wall or bearing partition may be cut or notched to a depth not exceeding 25 percent of its width. Studs in nonbearing partitions may be notched to a depth not to exceed 40 percent of a single stud width.
2. Drilling. Any stud may be bored or drilled, provided that the diameter of the resulting hole is no more than 60 percent of the stud width, the edge of the hole is no more than 5/8 inch (16 mm) to the edge of the stud, and the hole is not located in the same section as a cut or notch. Studs located in exterior walls or bearing partitions drilled over 40 percent and up to 60 percent shall also be doubled with no more than two successive doubled studs bored. See Figures R602.6(1) and R602.6(2).
Exception: Use of approved stud shoes is permitted when they are installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations.

I'll have look up the IBC in the office tomorrow
_________________________
"Live Awesome!" - Kevin Carosa
Top
#211500 - 10/20/13 01:45 PM Re: EMT question [Re: gfretwell]
gfretwell Offline


Member
Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9066
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
Since my wall is not nailed up yet (no SS nails) I am going to pre drill them right smack in the middle for smurf tube
(1" leaving the 1.25" of good wood on both sides)
The smurf will be squeaky tight in 1" holes but it should go in OK. Then I can have my raceway and still be plastic all the way.
_________________________
Greg Fretwell
Top
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >

Featured:

2017 NEC and Related
2017 NEC
Now Available!

Shout Box

Recent Posts
License exam
by TRUE POWER
01/23/17 09:16 PM
Looking for older post
by sparkyinak
01/23/17 12:27 AM
Members: Non-Members: Did you know?
by Admin
01/22/17 02:34 PM
Safety at heights?
by HotLine1
01/21/17 08:51 PM
International Wire Colour Codes
by Texas_Ranger
01/21/17 03:29 PM

Who's Online
1 registered (Admin), 72 Guests and 12 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
New in the Gallery:
Desk-mounted "power-board"
Top Posters
gfretwell 9066
Trumpy 8560
pauluk 7693
HotLine1 6833
sparky 5545
Member Spotlight
Member Since: 11/11/05
Posts: 190

ECN Electrical Forums - sponsored by Electrical Contractor Network - Electrical and Code Related Discussion for Electrical Contractors, Electricians, Inspectors, Instructors, Engineers and other related Professionals