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#199548 - 03/01/11 09:48 AM Non CAT III Rated Meter
KJay Offline
Member

Registered: 11/27/07
Posts: 763
Loc: MA, USA
Would using fused test leads rated at CAT III 1000V, CAT IV 600V, 10A allow use of an older non CAT III Rated meter on a jobsite as far as OSHA or NFPA 70E is concerned or would they still be considered only as supplemental protection?
Fused Test Leads

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#199551 - 03/01/11 11:22 AM Re: Non CAT III Rated Meter [Re: KJay]
HotLine1 Offline

Member

Registered: 04/03/02
Posts: 6785
Loc: Brick, NJ USA
Kjay:
A quick read of the link info, I may say 'Yes'
However, personally...I would speak to a Fluke rep/engineer.
The link read leads me to believe the probes will provide a safe means of testing.
_________________________
John

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#199576 - 03/01/11 08:01 PM Re: Non CAT III Rated Meter [Re: KJay]
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8530
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Originally Posted By: KJay
Would using fused test leads rated at CAT III 1000V, CAT IV 600V, 10A allow use of an older non CAT III Rated meter on a jobsite as far as OSHA or NFPA 70E is concerned or would they still be considered only as supplemental protection?

In my opinion, no.
After all the device that is being connected to a source of voltage or current is effectively the meter, the test leads are only a wire link, fused or not.
What the CAT rating is used for, is safety against voltage surges and spikes, these inherently will not blow a fuse and can expose the user of such a meter to fire and explosion hazards.

Have a read of this article from EC&M
_________________________
Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#199596 - 03/02/11 08:57 AM Re: Non CAT III Rated Meter [Re: Trumpy]
KJay Offline
Member

Registered: 11/27/07
Posts: 763
Loc: MA, USA
Originally Posted By: Trumpy
Originally Posted By: KJay
Would using fused test leads rated at CAT III 1000V, CAT IV 600V, 10A allow use of an older non CAT III Rated meter on a jobsite as far as OSHA or NFPA 70E is concerned or would they still be considered only as supplemental protection?

In my opinion, no.
After all the device that is being connected to a source of voltage or current is effectively the meter, the test leads are only a wire link, fused or not.
What the CAT rating is used for, is safety against voltage surges and spikes, these inherently will not blow a fuse and can expose the user of such a meter to fire and explosion hazards.

Have a read of this article from EC&M




That could very well be the case. I suppose a non CAT rated meter would likely have a low impedance design as well. Some of the statements in that article still have me wondering though.
Would it seem logical that the test leads being fused at 10A would be the first in line to see the increased current and could potentially open faster than the internal protection in the meter would, so in essence preventing any further damage?

The more I read on the subject, the more it seems that these safety ratings are contemplating complete and absolute blissful ignorance on the part of the person using the test equipment. So much so, it appears that they group test equipment users into the in the realm of unqualified amateur. Apparently these days, it really is too much to ask for an individual to be competent in the things he does and equipment he works with on a daily basis.

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