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#181853 - 11/03/08 07:23 PM need some help
Erick Offline
New Member

Registered: 07/31/08
Posts: 5
Loc: Ut
Guy's I am a crazy with embarrassment but here goes: An electric heater is rated for 2400 watts at 240 volts. What power is consumed when the heater is operated at 120 volts? I=P/E, R=E/I, I=E/R, P=EI, I know the steps but with unequal voltages?? man I am so stumped, I know the answer it's (600) but don't know the formula Ohms law out the window to a point what am I missing?

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#181854 - 11/03/08 08:17 PM Re: need some help [Re: Erick]
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant

Registered: 01/22/05
Posts: 5305
Loc: Blue Collar Country
Watts = Amps times Volts
Volts = Amps times Ohms
therefore .. Watts = Amps times amps times Ohms
so ... amps times amps is a 'squared' relationship
that is, reducing the volts by half, and you cut the amps by four (2x2). Thus, 1/4th the heat.

#181855 - 11/03/08 08:22 PM Re: need some help [Re: Erick]
canuck Offline

Registered: 07/15/06
Posts: 27
Loc: Canada
First, use this formula to calculate the resistance @ 240 Volts

p = e^2.......p = watts e = volts r = ohms(resistance)

2400 = (240)^2

R = ((240) x (240))

R = 24 ohms

Then use the same formula to calculate the power at 120 volts:

p = (120)^2

p = 600 watts

Here are some more formulas that are helpful:

Edited by canuck (11/03/08 08:26 PM)

#181856 - 11/03/08 09:32 PM Re: need some help [Re: canuck]
Erick Offline
New Member

Registered: 07/31/08
Posts: 5
Loc: Ut
Thanks very much you guy's are great! Erick

#181858 - 11/03/08 10:13 PM Re: need some help [Re: Erick]
SolarPowered Offline

Registered: 07/05/04
Posts: 615
Loc: Palo Alto, CA, USA
However, remember that the resistance of the heating element is likely to change with temperature, so 600W is only an approximation.


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