ECN Electrical Forum - Discussion Forums for Electricians, Inspectors and Related Professionals

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
#176840 - 04/14/08 09:37 AM Dryer circuit, 3 wire.
aldav53 Offline
Member
Registered: 08/22/01
Posts: 545
Loc: Chandler, AZ USA
Extending 3 wire a dryer circuit, doesn't seem any reason to use a 10-4 NM since I am tieing into a 10-3. Would there be any advange as far as hooking up the newer 4 wire dryers which the customer will probably use? I would have to tie the nuetral and ground together, or the new dryer would have to have a 3 wire cord put on it. Guess that would work too.
_________________________
The Golden Rule - "The man with the gold makes the rule"
Top
Work Gear for Electricians and the Trades
#176841 - 04/14/08 10:20 AM Re: Dryer circuit, 3 wire. [Re: aldav53]
gfretwell Offline


Member
Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9039
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
You would never need any more than 10/3 with ground on a dryer. The neutral does need to be insulated when using RX so you cant use 10/2 but there is an exception allowing SE if this is coming from the panel with the service disconnect.
_________________________
Greg Fretwell
Top
#176845 - 04/14/08 11:33 AM Re: Dryer circuit, 3 wire. [Re: gfretwell]
electure Offline


Member
Registered: 12/24/00
Posts: 4259
Loc: Fullerton, CA USA
10-4 NM doesn't exist. Is it 10-3 with a ground?

Top
#176846 - 04/14/08 11:42 AM Re: Dryer circuit, 3 wire. [Re: electure]
Jonno Offline
Member
Registered: 05/27/06
Posts: 20
I believe the OP has the following setup: 10/2 w/ ground to panel. OP would like to know weather to use 10/2 or 10/3 (w/ ground) for the extension.

My advice: replace the exisiting circuit with new 10/3 w/ground to the panel.
Top
#176847 - 04/14/08 12:49 PM Re: Dryer circuit, 3 wire. [Re: Jonno]
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant
Member
Registered: 01/22/05
Posts: 5316
Loc: Blue Collar Country
This is one of those situations where you have to choose: will it be fish or fowl? Either is better than a mash of both together!

You want to keep the existing dryer unchanged, and extend the existing circuit ... stick with the same number of conductors.

You want to be compliant with the newer codes, make a new run with the additional wire, get a new cord for the dryer, and DISCONNECT THE BONDing strap inside the dryer.

Just using 'new' wire for the extension, and having a new receptacle that LOOKS like it has a neutral, but does not, is the worst possible way to do things.
Top
#176848 - 04/14/08 01:39 PM Re: Dryer circuit, 3 wire. [Re: renosteinke]
KJ Offline
Junior Member
Registered: 11/08/01
Posts: 52
when all else fails, hire and pay small price to do right once.
Top
#176853 - 04/14/08 03:30 PM Re: Dryer circuit, 3 wire. [Re: KJ]
aldav53 Offline
Member
Registered: 08/22/01
Posts: 545
Loc: Chandler, AZ USA
Yes I meant 10-3 with ground, actually I checked this and it has a black, white, and red, no ground wire, 10-3 NM with no ground, I've never seen this wire before.
Anyway I'll just run a 10-3 with ground so at least the 3rd wire will be white and insulated. The old dryer is tied into the 3 terminals but not to ground, and there is no jumper, (being an older one) so not sure if they grounded the white nuetral inside the dryer or not.
_________________________
The Golden Rule - "The man with the gold makes the rule"
Top
#176855 - 04/14/08 04:55 PM Re: Dryer circuit, 3 wire. [Re: aldav53]
Jonno Offline
Member
Registered: 05/27/06
Posts: 20
Is the old wire armoured? If it is the armour is the ground, albeit a questionable one.
Top
#176856 - 04/14/08 05:04 PM Re: Dryer circuit, 3 wire. [Re: Jonno]
NORCAL Offline
Member
Registered: 09/25/02
Posts: 865
If you extend a existing 3 wire dryer/range receptacle,wouldnt you need to bring it up to compliance w/ current code(s) since 250.140 applies to EXISTING installations and if one extends it IMO it would no longer be existing....
Top
#176857 - 04/14/08 05:15 PM Re: Dryer circuit, 3 wire. [Re: NORCAL]
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant
Member
Registered: 01/22/05
Posts: 5316
Loc: Blue Collar Country
A good point, Norcal. One could very easily make that argument, and that is certainly the preferred solution.

I guess I've become a bit jaded, having seen far too many DIY/hack jobs. I guess that's why I even described a way to extend the old circuit .... I had the feeling that was something we were not being told, and I didn't want a half-baked job being done.

Just like simply replacing a two-prong receptacle with a three-prong version is not, in any way, an "upgrade," I didn't want there to be a dryer with a 4-prong receptacle on a circuit that didn't have all four wires going all the way back to the panel. Or, any of the other nightmares where things were not done completely.
Top
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >

Member Spotlight
Member Since: 04/03/02
Posts: 6778
New in the Gallery:
SE cable question
Featured:

2017 NEC and Related
2017 NEC
Now Available!

Shout Box


Who's Online
1 registered (HotLine1), 61 Guests and 10 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
 
New in the Gallery:
SE cable question
 
Top Posters (30 Days)
Admin 47
HotLine1 43
gfretwell 19
Ruben Rocha 12
Trumpy 9
 
Newest Members
Scotto, Freecrowder, clee512, Jdscott2005, FAIZAN

ECN Electrical Forums - sponsored by Electrical Contractor Network - Electrical and Code Related Discussion for Electrical Contractors, Electricians, Inspectors, Instructors, Engineers and other related Professionals