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#175440 - 02/29/08 06:58 PM Surge protection receptacles
Jer Offline
New Member

Registered: 02/29/08
Posts: 1
Loc: Vancouver Island Britich Colum...
I found a leviton brand receptacle that is a surge protector. But from all the information provided I could not figure out if the plug protects only what is plugged into it or if it is like a GFCI plug with line and load sides. So has anyone seen or used these, do I need to buy one to protect a whole circuit or do I use one in each outlet box?

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#175455 - 03/01/08 02:27 PM Re: Surge protection receptacles [Re: Jer]
Tom Offline
Member

Registered: 01/01/01
Posts: 1069
Loc: Shinnston, WV USA
The protection offered will depend on what is connected downstream from the receptacle.

I usually install a surge protector as the first outlet on a string and my customers have not reported any surge related problems when plugging in electronic equipment downstream from this receptacle. However, all bets are off if a vacuum cleaner or other motor load is plugged in downstream from the surge protected receptacle.

I have also installed a surge protected receptacle at each point of use when the cost of the equipment and/or downtime warrants it. You'll have to weigh the cost of the equipment versus the cost of the recptacles & make your own determination. When I was working for a fairly large bank in this area, I convinced them to put in a TVSS receptacle at the point of use for every computer terminal & teller machine. Their savings on repair bills for teller machines alone more than paid for the receptacle installation in less than a year.
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#175456 - 03/01/08 02:56 PM Re: Surge protection receptacles [Re: Jer]
mbhydro Offline
Member

Registered: 02/21/03
Posts: 340
Loc: Winnipeg MB Canada
I think it depends on which one you have.

I have two new ones in front of me right now still in the bubble pack with the same number on them 5280. I know that I did not buy them at the same time so I don't know which is the new version.

They are different, one of them is designed for pass through protection and the other is designed for single circuit or pigtail use on a regular circuit (line only terminals no load ones).

If you have the one with the green ground pig tale out the back it is single point of protection.

If you have the one with the line and load screws you can use it at the point your electronics are and it will protect any receptacles downline to a certain point.

The installation instructions say that protection will diminish for each receptacle downstream so I would pigtail it in a box near my point of use.

I have one of these Leviton's in use for my TV / VCR /cable box for many years and I can't remember if I have ever had to replace it. I know we have had power spikes in the house as I have had to replace a different brand in the den where my computer is because it activated. \:\(

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#175463 - 03/01/08 07:50 PM Re: Surge protection receptacles [Re: mbhydro]
gfretwell Offline

Member

Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9012
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
At a certain point you have to believe a shunt type surge protector is protecting everything on the service and their protection is additive,
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#175499 - 03/03/08 03:50 AM Re: Surge protection receptacles [Re: gfretwell]
SteveFehr Offline
Member

Registered: 03/19/05
Posts: 1192
Loc: Chesapeake, VA
Jer,

Surge protection uses metal oxide varyistors to shunt overloads to ground. They quite literally just short circuit hot to ground in the event of a voltage transient. It *should* be effective anywhere on the circuit, whether in series, parallel or on a completely different breaker, though voltage drop associated with the MOV activation on that branch circuit may help reduce the spike a little. Would, honestly, be most effective right at the panel, as it would protect your entire house- they make breaker style TVSS or small external ones you plug right into the panel that are far more effective than any receptacle or power strip would be.

If you get a direct lightning strike, you're toast regardless. And don't forget the CATV and phone lines!


Edited by SteveFehr (03/03/08 03:51 AM)

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