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#171416 - 11/27/07 02:20 PM section 18 CEC
jay8 Offline
Member

Registered: 07/28/05
Posts: 183
Loc: Vancouver, BC
I am not well versed on this section of the code, especially the 20th edition. What would be the classification of a room with a 40, 000 litre tank storing # 2 fuel oil be? IE this is diesel, so I dont know if with the flash point of diesel, the area isnt a hazardous location.
It seems that a room with a diesel genset is not a hazardous location either, and you are pretty much certain fuel is being stored there.

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#171502 - 11/29/07 01:31 PM Re: section 18 CEC [Re: jay8]
Rick Kelly Offline
Member

Registered: 01/11/06
Posts: 60
Loc: Iqaluit, NU, Canada
#2 heating oil is not considered a volatile substance as its flash point is very high, 52 degrees C. Locations where it is stored is not considered a hazardous location for the requirements of sections 18 and 20 of the CEC.

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#171634 - 12/02/07 08:07 AM Re: section 18 CEC [Re: Rick Kelly]
jay8 Offline
Member

Registered: 07/28/05
Posts: 183
Loc: Vancouver, BC
Thanks Rick, are you referencing a rule on flash point? I checked sections 18 and 20 and also the appendix, and did not find diesel/#2 heaing oil mentioned, so I assume it is not part of those sections.

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#171647 - 12/02/07 10:56 AM Re: section 18 CEC [Re: jay8]
SP4RX Offline
Member

Registered: 10/01/07
Posts: 56
Loc: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada...eh
Hi Jay.
If section 18 applies to diesel, it would have to be a Class 1 location as per 18-004 (a)---"Class 1 locations are those in which flammable gases or vapours are or may be present in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive gas atmospheres"

So I guess the question is whether diesel produces flammable gases "in quantities sufficient to produce explosive gas atmospheres".

Looking at the table in appendix B (18-066), I see that diesel is not listed. However, looking at fuel oil #2 msds sheets (section 5), it would appear that diesel does indeed give off explosive vapours.

I would think that 18-006-(c)-(ii) would apply, as you have "flammable volatile liquids...normally confined within closed containers...can escape only as a result of accidental rupture or breakdown..."

Just my $0.02


Shawn.

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#171667 - 12/02/07 06:44 PM Re: section 18 CEC [Re: SP4RX]
leland Offline
Member

Registered: 08/20/07
Posts: 856
Loc: Lowell area, Ma. USA
Not technical.. well maybe. Mythe Busters, Did a show on a leaking gas tank catching up to a speeding away vehicle and blowing up. That didn't happen, The gas stayed up to speed at about 3 MPH.
Then the diesel test: Even slower and they had a difficult time even getting the vapors to ignite.

For what it's worth. (Just a lighter momment)

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#171688 - 12/03/07 07:33 AM Re: section 18 CEC [Re: leland]
Rick Kelly Offline
Member

Registered: 01/11/06
Posts: 60
Loc: Iqaluit, NU, Canada
NFPA 497 - "Recommended Practice for the Classification of Flammable Liquids, Gases, or Vapors and of Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas". Defines a "Flammable Liquid" as one that has a flash point lower then 100 degF.

This means Diesel or #2 heating oils, with a flash point of 152 degF, is a "combustible liquid" and not a "flammable" one. And as such, CEC sections 18 & 20 clearly do not apply to a combustible liquid, only a flamable one.

Here is a link with some reading on the subject... While this is a link that is based on the NEC, the situation is the same.

http://www.mikeholt.com/codeforum/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=22;t=000043

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#171781 - 12/05/07 12:11 PM Re: section 18 CEC [Re: Rick Kelly]
jay8 Offline
Member

Registered: 07/28/05
Posts: 183
Loc: Vancouver, BC
Again thanks. You have to do a bit of digging for it, but it appears section 18 and 20 do refer to flammable liquids and combustible dusts, I dont see combustible liquids.

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