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#170319 - 10/31/07 01:39 PM Outlet locations in hallways
barbwire Offline
Junior Member
Registered: 05/15/03
Posts: 17
Hello all, I need to know the minimum distance between convienience receptacles in an apartment biulding hallway, the hallways range from 50 feet to 100 ft between fire doors (approx) . Does 210.52 (H) still apply ?

Thank You.
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#170328 - 10/31/07 04:41 PM Re: Outlet locations in hallways [Re: barbwire]
gfretwell Online   content


Member
Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9039
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
210.52(H) might be a decent guideline from a design standpoint but it really only applies within the dwelling units in an apartment building.
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Greg Fretwell
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#170445 - 11/03/07 04:51 AM Re: Outlet locations in hallways [Re: gfretwell]
barbwire Offline
Junior Member
Registered: 05/15/03
Posts: 17
Thanks for the quick response Greg, seems like I could put as many receptacles as I want,or even none at all when it comes to hallways outside actual dwelling units.
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#170454 - 11/03/07 08:41 AM Re: Outlet locations in hallways [Re: barbwire]
SP4RX Offline
Member
Registered: 10/01/07
Posts: 56
Loc: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada...eh
Up here in the frozen north we're required to install receptacles in "public corridors of residential occupancies", i.e. apartment hallways, spaced no farther than about 33 feet. (10 meters)


Shawn.
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#170459 - 11/03/07 09:51 AM Re: Outlet locations in hallways [Re: SP4RX]
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant
Member
Registered: 01/22/05
Posts: 5316
Loc: Blue Collar Country
MINIMUM distance? I'd say about 3 inches .... the boxes bump into each other. laugh

Otherwise .... I again remind everyone ... section 90 of the NEC makes cleat that the NEC is NOT a design manual, and simply complying with the code could very well result in an inadequate installation. It's a 'safety' code, not a 'use' code.

If I were to design a public building, I'd go look at a vacuum cleaner first. How long is the cord? You might consider that in spacing your receptacles.
For a similar reason, I'd make sure there was a receptacle in every lobby, stair landing, and closet. If the space is divided by a door, or something that suggests traffic through it, I'd consider one on each side of the path.

Ditto for the hall lighting. I've seen far too many code-compliant hallways that were little more than dark tunnels with exit signs at the end. There are ample means to provide for both 'energy savings' AND decent lighting levels.
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#170475 - 11/03/07 08:41 PM Re: Outlet locations in hallways [Re: renosteinke]
gfretwell Online   content


Member
Registered: 07/20/04
Posts: 9039
Loc: Estero,Fl,usa
John, your first idea is probably all you need to know. If you can get from spot to spot in the hall with the vacuum without an extension cord I think you are doing OK and since vacuuming past a doorway is not a problem I think you are done. If they are going to want a fixed appliance (lamp or whatever) they need a receptacle installed there. That is what "building electricians are for isn't it) wink
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Greg Fretwell
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#170487 - 11/04/07 07:20 AM Re: Outlet locations in hallways [Re: gfretwell]
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant
Member
Registered: 01/22/05
Posts: 5316
Loc: Blue Collar Country
Greg, you are right ... I did expand my answer beyond the original 'receptacles in hallways' question.

Call it a weakness, a blind spot of mine. When I wire a place, I try to imagine the place as it will be used. Often, this means any number of casual chats with the folks who will actually be using the place.

It's been my experience that a good design almost always complies with 'code' .... whether it be the electrical code, or any other.

The opposite has not been true. Places 'wired to code' almost always have some violations, or code conflicts .... and the customer is not happy with the result, either.

In some ways, this problem seems to have got worse over the years. Architects' offices seem to delegate 90% of the design to draftsmen, who sit at their computer screens, cranking stuff out 'by the numbers.' The connection to the customer is lost early in this process.


Perhaps the best illustration of this .... and, yes, this is WAY off topic .... are the lively discussions I've had over the years with folks who wanted me to install lights above pools. Sure, it can be done in a legal way .... especially if the ceiling is 20 ft. up .... but would you like to try to change a bulb? Those little details will bite you laugh
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