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#165280 - 06/24/07 08:13 PM Range Violations
Webmaster Offline

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Member

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 3142
Loc: NY, USA
 Quote:
Found these pictures I'd taken during my days in maintenance work that I had never gotten developed. A minor example of the slip-shod guess-work that goes on under the radar in a lot of apartment complexes.

These are all photos of the electric range cord connections. In the time I was there, I replaced or repaired dozens of ranges and never once found one were the cord was wired 100% right. These photos show the common violations:

Picture 1: Despite the fact that the apartments were wired for four-wire range receptacles all the original ranges were bottom of the line, pure 240 volts, and required no neutral because there were no bells-n-whistles that required 120 volt loads. When it came time to replace the cord, the installer found himself with a pesky extra white wire. Not only did they end up creating a hard connection between the EGC and the neutral [250.6(A), 250.6(B), 310.4], but there is no jumper between that terminal and the case of the stove, so the range is still ungrounded [250.140]. Also, if you look closely you'll see that the cord jacket was stripped back too far and the cord clamp is actually tightened on the individual conductors [Maybe 300.4?].



Picture 2: This is a newer stove that replaced the straight 240V models.
Probably a different maintenance man installed these: No connector this time [400.10 and 400.14], but the bonding jumper in still intact. I never once saw a four-wire stove where the bonding jumper had been removed [250.6(A) and 250.6(B)].



It's a shame I never got pictures of the water-heater installs. Between the electrical, plumbing, and general building violations (one replacement water heater was balanced on a single 4" x 4" post to raise it to the existing pipes) these photos are tame.

-BigJohn

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#165299 - 06/25/07 08:11 AM Re: Range Violations [Re: Webmaster]
EV607797 Offline
Member

Registered: 10/25/06
Posts: 756
Loc: Fredericksburg, VA, USA
I agree that I don't think that I have ever seen a range or dryer with a 4-wire cord connected properly either. A friend of mine had just purchased a brand-new house and both appliances were connected much like your photo #2.
_________________________
---Ed---

"But the guy at Home Depot said it would work."

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#165359 - 06/26/07 07:58 AM Re: Range Violations [Re: EV607797]
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
I can understand the weekend Destroy-It-Yourselfer getting this wrong, but from this and previous comments in the past, it seems that even those who should understand the principles involved get it wrong as well.

I can't help but wonder why this should be the case. The 3- vs. 4-wire connection seems clear enough to me, and I've never had to install a range to this standard!

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#165362 - 06/26/07 09:31 AM Re: Range Violations [Re: pauluk]
BrianP Offline
Member

Registered: 02/01/07
Posts: 65
Loc: Minnesota
People don't read instructions. I've wired a few dryer cords, and the installation instructions are generally very clear on how to do this.

This is one of the reasons why I prefer to install appliances myself. I take the time to read (and follow) the instructions, so I know it is installed correctly.

Most installers I've seen are in a hurry to get it done and get to the next job.

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#165428 - 06/27/07 01:46 PM Re: Range Violations [Re: BrianP]
brianl703 Offline
Member

Registered: 05/16/05
Posts: 165
Loc: Manassas, VA
I once purchased a used stove, it had been connected to a 4-wire plug and the bonding jumper *was* missing as would be expected.

Sears wanted $60 for a replacement bonding jumper.

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#165429 - 06/27/07 02:48 PM Re: Range Violations [Re: brianl703]
EV607797 Offline
Member

Registered: 10/25/06
Posts: 756
Loc: Fredericksburg, VA, USA
Paul:

I think a big part of the problem is that three-wire range and dryer wiring were the standard for many many years. There was absolutely no thought process required to connect them since the cable was flat (parallel conductors). You almost had to go out of your way to miswire them. Trust me, I've installed hundreds of them with one eye open after a hard weekend.

Most handymen and DIY's don't understand the difference between a bond, a ground and a neutral. They consider them to be one in the same.

Brian:

That's about the time I would have gotten a one-foot piece of THHN and two Sta-Kon terminals!
_________________________
---Ed---

"But the guy at Home Depot said it would work."

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#165430 - 06/27/07 02:49 PM Re: Range Violations [Re: brianl703]
Retired_Helper Offline
Member

Registered: 03/13/07
Posts: 167
Loc: Maine
\:o Question answered while I was posting.


Edited by Retired_Helper (06/27/07 02:51 PM)
Edit Reason: Emily Latella: "Never mind!"

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#165462 - 06/28/07 07:46 AM Re: Range Violations [Re: brianl703]
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
 Originally Posted By: brianl703
Sears wanted $60 for a replacement bonding jumper.


\:o

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#165491 - 06/28/07 05:01 PM Re: Range Violations [Re: pauluk]
NORCAL Offline
Member

Registered: 09/25/02
Posts: 807
 Originally Posted By: pauluk
 Originally Posted By: brianl703
Sears wanted $60 for a replacement bonding jumper.


\:o

And folks wonder why I have little use for Sears.

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#165963 - 07/08/07 09:19 PM Re: Range Violations [Re: EV607797]
brianl703 Offline
Member

Registered: 05/16/05
Posts: 165
Loc: Manassas, VA
 Originally Posted By: EV607797

That's about the time I would have gotten a one-foot piece of THHN and two Sta-Kon terminals!


I decided to cut the ground wire off the now-useless 4-wire cord the range came with, which gave me a jumper wire with a ring terminal on one end. All I needed was a ring terminal for the other end..I ended up using, not a sta-kon terminal, but a terminal with a set-screw for the 8 gauge wire. A "copper mechanical lug". It consists of a metal block which has a place for the set screw which is attached to about a 3/8" wide, 1/8" thick metal strap with a hole on the end of it. I put that on the other end of the wire and connected the neutral and ground terminals together with it. I think the copper mechanical lug is probably way, way overkill for the application but it was a lot cheaper than $60 ;\)

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