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#163459 - 05/08/07 12:08 PM Question about OSHA
DDROWE Offline
New Member

Registered: 05/08/07
Posts: 2
Loc: PA
Does anyone know if there is a requirement to have a "written permit" to perform work on energized equipment in the industrial setting? Our EHS is trying to force this and it is sooooooo time consuming. The only ones that do this work are trained and have all (if not more) of the required PPE.


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#163462 - 05/08/07 12:50 PM Re: Question about OSHA [Re: DDROWE]
Luketrician Offline

Registered: 07/08/06
Posts: 273
Loc: Sale Creek, TN USA
Industrial settings? All of the plants and mills I have worked in have had their own saftey guidelines. I don't think you have much choice but to abide by them.

Welcome to ECN also. \:\)
Luke Clarke
Electrical Planner for TVA.

#163470 - 05/08/07 04:07 PM Re: Question about OSHA [Re: Luketrician]
Tom Offline

Registered: 01/01/01
Posts: 1069
Loc: Shinnston, WV USA
Your employer is legally required to provide a workplace that is safe and implementing an electrical safety plan is the way to go. The written plan would include procedures for hot work. It is not supposed to be easy to get the hot work permit. The permit is only supposed to be issued under certain conditions such as turning off the power would introduce additional hazards or interrupt a continuous process. The permit is actually required (I believe) by NFPA 70E, which is the usual basis for an electrical safety program.

Your EHS is not forcing anything IMO, only trying to comply with the minimum requirements of the law.

I also welcome you to ECN.

Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example.


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