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#158739 - 08/17/06 04:11 PM High ceilings
scameron81 Offline
Member

Registered: 02/24/04
Posts: 80
Loc: Healdsburg, ca, USA
I was wondering if you guys have multipliers for high ceilings. I am bidding large residential shop with 16' ceilings and I am trying to figure how much time to add for all the extra steps up and down the ladder. I was thinking somewhere in the 10-15% range.
Any thoughts?

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Business, Office, Estimating, Legal:
#158740 - 08/17/06 04:54 PM Re: High ceilings
LK Offline

Member

Registered: 01/21/03
Posts: 1721
Loc: New Jersey
There are time and motion units for ladder tasks, but they don't include your employees mood for the day, or job conditions, your best figures come from job actuals records, it may pay to look at scaffold or lift, there may be a savings, compared to moving ladders, and attempting to carry equipment, and material up a ladder.

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#158741 - 08/17/06 06:09 PM Re: High ceilings
macmikeman Offline
Member

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 718
Loc: Honolulu, Hawaii
LK is right on the money. Also factor this, on day #1 I work pretty fast off a 12 foot step ladder. On day #2 I start out slightly slower and by the end of the day am begining to feel it. On day #3 marked difference in speed. All this is negated however if the job runs 2 weeks or more in which case I get acclimated to the weight of moving that ladder around and it all becomes normal again. Make the job last 6 months or more and I can work that ladder like its a 4 footer.

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#158742 - 08/18/06 11:55 AM Re: High ceilings
kencr Offline
Member

Registered: 07/25/04
Posts: 36
Loc: Southern, NJ USA
Anything over an 8' ladder ?? We bring in the sissor lift .. but that is commerical work. I know the owner of our company charges big bucks for extra high work.

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#158743 - 08/18/06 01:29 PM Re: High ceilings
SteveFehr Offline
Member

Registered: 03/19/05
Posts: 1192
Loc: Chesapeake, VA
Speaking of which... I've got some 20' ceilings and no clue how to safely work up there. How do you guys usually handle rooms that tall, 16' stepladder? What do the drywall people do? I was thinking about just biting the bullet and building staging out of 2x and plywood. This is just a cathedral ceiling in a residence, so no boom truck.

[This message has been edited by SteveFehr (edited 08-18-2006).]

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#158744 - 08/18/06 09:17 PM Re: High ceilings
macmikeman Offline
Member

Registered: 07/16/02
Posts: 718
Loc: Honolulu, Hawaii
You could look into renting a one man genie lift for that. It can be transported in the bed of a pickup truck.

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#158745 - 08/19/06 03:58 AM Re: High ceilings
BobbyHo Offline
Member

Registered: 07/27/05
Posts: 33
Loc: CT
If you are going to use a 16' step ladder, plan on having a 2nd person with you. I have one and I hate using it. It weighs alot and is like trying to move around a telephone pole.

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#158746 - 08/19/06 04:41 AM Re: High ceilings
Tiger Offline
Member

Registered: 05/04/05
Posts: 714
Loc: Crystal Lake, IL USA
If the residential shop has a concrete floor the scissors lift is a great way to go. Add the rental & some non-productive time to the bid & have fun. I timed myself on a commercial job with identical tasks & the lift cut my time in half. It was a lot easier day with the lift also.

BobbyHo has it with the ladder. A 16' stepladder has a huge footprint. The legs may be 10' apart and it might weigh an awkward 200lbs. It's much more common to use scaffold, which you'll need a second guy to assemble.

Dave

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#158747 - 08/22/06 11:02 AM Re: High ceilings
livetoride Offline
Member

Registered: 01/11/05
Posts: 109
Loc: san diego ca usa
I second the scaffold. around here there are alot of high end homes with 20' ceilings that are multi level. You can't get a lift in and a scaffold works better than the tall ladders/ Rod

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#158748 - 08/22/06 09:16 PM Re: High ceilings
ExpressQuote Offline
Member

Registered: 04/27/06
Posts: 83
Loc: BC, Canada
Just out of curiousity, doesn't the general have scaffolding on site for the subtrades?

Usually, the GCs here will have scaffolding on site, and if it is a concern, we usually put it into the contract that the GC is to supply or we charge for additional cost of rental....

Just my thoughts.

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