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#153409 - 01/22/07 08:39 PM Old Fittings (UK)
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 Quote:
Some electrical fittings in a house I'm working in.

The white tube is porcelain and was the service entrance through the outside stonebuilt wall.

The tube cut off just above the mantelpiece is an original victorian acetylene gas light pipe. It's the equivalent of a 5 amp round pin socket, plumbing in lights around the room goes back long before electricity.

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#153410 - 01/22/07 09:20 PM Re: Old Fittings (UK)
yaktx Offline
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Registered: 02/19/03
Posts: 286
Loc: Austin, Texas, USA
Those BS1363 sockets look ancient. Has this house gotten a lot of moisture damage?

Acetylene lights? I thought the norm in the 19th century was coal gas (mostly hydrogen). I associate acetylene with miner's headlamps (and very early automobile headlamps).

Is this in town or in the country?

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#153411 - 01/23/07 04:47 AM Re: Old Fittings (UK)
pauluk Offline
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Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
I still have a few of those GEC light switches in my box (pic #2 top/middle and pic #3), although they're a little cleaner!

I'd put the MK sockets at early/mid 1950s, which is consistent with the rubber-insulated cables. The BS1363 standard didn't appear until the very end of the 1940s, so there weren't many British homes which had these sockets before about 1950 at the earliest.

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#153412 - 01/23/07 08:56 AM Re: Old Fittings (UK)
cschow Offline
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Registered: 09/08/06
Posts: 41
Loc: Boise, ID, USA
Cool finds.

If those pics are any indication of the rest of the place, I would say you guys have your work cut out for you.

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#153413 - 01/23/07 11:01 AM Re: Old Fittings (UK)
Texas_Ranger Offline
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Registered: 12/17/01
Posts: 2343
Loc: Vienna, Austria
Oh boy, that house looks like it sat empty and open for decades! (And probably has a few roof holes too)... usually I see stuff like that in houses that get bulldozed soon.

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#153414 - 02/04/07 03:50 PM Re: Old Fittings (UK)
gideonr Offline
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Registered: 12/18/04
Posts: 152
Loc: Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Right! Got a few of the GE switches, tho used for a model railway layout these days, only 12 Volt.

Anyone know any history on the 'Walsall Patent' switch?

This is right out in the country, all mod cons 1860 style including acetylene lighting (now in the Biggar Gas Museum), plumbed bathrooms, electricity arrived 1954. There's not a lot of roof left...

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#153415 - 02/05/07 08:30 AM Re: Old Fittings (UK)
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Registered: 12/17/01
Posts: 2343
Loc: Vienna, Austria
 Quote:
There's not a lot of roof left...

Too bad... but that's what it looks like!

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#153416 - 02/09/07 08:47 AM Re: Old Fittings (UK)
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#153417 - 02/09/07 05:03 PM Re: Old Fittings (UK)
Trumpy Offline

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Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Crikey,
Talk about moisture damage!.
Them switches used to be used here in NZ quite prevalently.
5A switching load aren't they?, I have seen some as low as 2A, from back when lighting circuits were rated at 5A a piece.
I see on the switch bodies that they had an English patent, that seems strange when at least one company here made them, but the majority were imported from Good Old Blighty!.
_________________________
Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#153418 - 02/09/07 05:57 PM Re: Old Fittings (UK)
yaktx Offline
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Registered: 02/19/03
Posts: 286
Loc: Austin, Texas, USA
Interesting thing about the acetylene lamps, knowing the house is in the country, that makes sense. Generating acetylene at home is far easier and less complicated than generating coal gas.

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