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#153185 - 06/24/06 05:12 AM Attitudes to domestic equipment
pauluk Offline
Member
Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
An interesting article from June 1964 about British reticence in adopting new equipment:
http://electrical-contractor.net/pc/Attitude1964.jpg
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#153186 - 06/26/06 07:16 AM Re: Attitudes to domestic equipment
SvenNYC Offline
Member
Registered: 08/19/02
Posts: 1685
Loc: New York City
I find it hard to believe that in 20th century Great Britain, people in urban/suburban environments were still cooking on hearth fires instead of using cookers connected to town or bottled gas.

That's the kind of thing I expect to see in farm houses.
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#153187 - 06/26/06 10:28 AM Re: Attitudes to domestic equipment
classicsat Offline
Member
Registered: 11/23/02
Posts: 449
A couple months ago I saw a series called "No. 57, The History Of A House", about a Regency era terrace house in Bristol UK. It never received elecricity until the 1960s, and that gas (not sure if town or bottled gas), at least for lighting in the 1900s, and I think in the 1930s a gas cooker.
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#153188 - 07/06/06 02:13 AM Re: Attitudes to domestic equipment
Trumpy Offline


Member
Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8560
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Good Lord,
Haven't things changed as far as journalism is concerned, since 1964??.
Blame the house-wife, indeed, you wouldn't get away with that sort of talk these days.
These days, it's "Men??, who are they??."

[This message has been edited by Trumpy (edited 07-06-2006).]
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#153189 - 07/08/06 09:12 AM Re: Attitudes to domestic equipment
uksparx Offline
Member
Registered: 04/25/05
Posts: 44
Loc: Egremont,Cumbria,UK
Well that's a relief to hear! After seeing the ad. for the new Terios on Daihatsu's NZ site, I thought you were still very sexist down there. The Terios being a small 4x4, the ad. says "4WD = For Women Drivers".
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#153190 - 08/12/06 05:46 PM Re: Attitudes to domestic equipment
djk Offline
Member
Registered: 12/26/02
Posts: 1269
Loc: Ireland
I don't think many of them were cooking on fires. The gas cooker was pretty popular for a very long time.

Automatic washing machines and dryers took an unusually long time to become universal. There were still plenty of non-automatic machines in use in the 1970s!!
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#153191 - 08/13/06 01:25 AM Re: Attitudes to domestic equipment
pauluk Offline
Member
Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Quote:
There were still plenty of non-automatic machines in use in the 1970s!!


The "twin tub" machines remained popular here for a very long time.
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#153192 - 08/21/06 07:10 AM Re: Attitudes to domestic equipment
Kenbo Offline
Member
Registered: 04/07/06
Posts: 234
Loc: Scotland
My wife was using a twin tub washer untill the early 90s.

She still insists it got the clothes cleaner than an automatic machine and would have one back in an instant.......
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#192705 - 02/26/10 08:36 AM Re: Attitudes to domestic equipment [Re: SvenNYC]
ricardian Offline
New Member
Registered: 02/26/10
Posts: 1
Loc: Stronsay, Orkney UK
Originally Posted By SvenNYC
I find it hard to believe that in 20th century Great Britain, people in urban/suburban environments were still cooking on hearth fires instead of using cookers connected to town or bottled gas.

That's the kind of thing I expect to see in farm houses.

We moved into a brand-new council house in 1953 - I was 10 years old. The tiny kitchen had one gas ring and a gas-fired galvanised tub which was used to heat water for washing clothes. There was a built-in coal-fired range in the living room which consisted of a back-boiler (domestic hot water) and an oven at the side of the coal fire. Electric power sockets were few and far between; one in the main bedroom; none in the other bedroom; a double socket in the living room; and a single socket in the kitchen (we were posh, we had an electric kettle).
I've just (Feb 2010) discovered this forum - fascinating stuff!
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--
Bruce Fletcher
Stronsay, Orkney UK
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#192731 - 02/27/10 03:31 PM Re: Attitudes to domestic equipment [Re: ricardian]
Alan Belson Offline
Member
Registered: 03/23/05
Posts: 1801
Loc: Mayenne N. France
Welcome to ECN Bruce.

I was bought up in what would now be described as a poor 'working class' home, [ that is, we were permanently broke!] and I never saw anyone cooking over open fires as a boy except tramps [ er...hobos blush] - and boy scouts. We had a range, a blacked-iron coal fired oven with hot plates. Ma polished the living daylights out of it with 'Zebrite', a mixture of graphite and boot polish, so it shone like a mirror. It had to be managed like a steam engine, and could turn our entire 2 up 2 down into a hothouse while baking or boiling. Other days, if the wind was in the wrong direction, it just filled the place with smoke and sulferous smuts! Sukie [the kettle] sat whimpering and whispering on it 24/7 for the interminal rounds of tea partaken by the Brits in those times. Some models even had a tea-boiler with a brass tap to provide everlasting brews of the stuff! We had gas lights and took candles up to bed till the 'leccy was fitted in 1954.
Happy days!


Edited by Alan Belson (02/27/10 03:32 PM)
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