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#150973 - 03/08/06 08:10 AM This is a worry...
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Thinking about using a cherry-picker on a job in the near future?.
You may like to have a read of this:
Cherry- Picker PDF
{File size is just over 1MB, but is well worth a read.}
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Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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Arc Flash PPE Clothing, LOTO & Insulated Tools
#150974 - 03/08/06 01:00 PM Re: This is a worry...
Big Ed Offline
Member

Registered: 04/07/04
Posts: 56
Loc: Roxboro, NC, USA
Nasty.

Good report, but it looks like they may have been "shotgunning" a little at the end. They mentioned fiberglass degradation at the end, but it was never mentioned as a mitigating factor. (personally, I think that it still would have snapped even if it were brand new). I don't know if I would have added that if it wasn't a cause.

I use these types of lifts quite a bit, and it makes me nervous every time. (I don't like hights to start). It reminds me of one of my favorite cliches : Never trust an interlock (guard) to save your life.

All of the lifts we use are rentals, and I just assume that none of the safety features are going to work. It makes me pay alot more attention to what I am doing.

Ed

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#150975 - 03/09/06 07:38 AM Re: This is a worry...
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Ed,
I agree with the majority of your post.
I use bucket trucks as a matter of course in my line of work (PoCo Line-Mechanic).
Our gear is stripped totally every 6 months and inspected.
Having said that, the only fibre-glass part of the truck is the actual bucket.
The rest of it is insulated with multiple layers of neoprene and PVC.
Even the stabilising legs.
Mind you when fibre-glass "goes" is does so in a hurry!.
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#150976 - 03/09/06 04:42 PM Re: This is a worry...
renosteinke Offline
Cat Servant
Member

Registered: 01/22/05
Posts: 5305
Loc: Blue Collar Country
I have seen a number of bucket lifts that were also designed to be used as cranes....rotate the basket aside, and there is a a hook & pulley ready for use.

I am amazed that there is no relief valve, regulator, ir other device in the hydraulic system that would not limit the force applied to within limits safe for the boom.

Or- is what I'm asking impossible for some reason?

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#150977 - 03/09/06 07:10 PM Re: This is a worry...
NJwirenut Offline
Member

Registered: 09/15/01
Posts: 816
Loc: Bergen County, NJ
 Quote:
I am amazed that there is no relief valve, regulator, ir other device in the hydraulic system that would not limit the force applied to within limits safe for the boom.


My thoughts exactly. Almost every hydraulic system I have ever come across has a bypass valve or something similar to limit oil pressure in case a cylinder gets jammed or something like that.

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#150978 - 03/12/06 02:54 AM Re: This is a worry...
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
John,Kenny,
I think you guys are thinking of the older single redundancy system.
Double redundancy offers a better degree of control under fault conditions.
Double redundancy also offers the chance that a line burst won't send you to the ground as quick.
This is Hydraulics we are talking about here, low pressure one end, high pressure the other mean anything?.

[This message has been edited by Trumpy (edited 03-12-2006).]
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