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#149762 - 02/14/04 03:41 PM Down Under Electrical Accidents
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Here is a website that I frequently like to have a read of:
http://www.eea.co.nz/accident_reports.html#MOC
There are some interesting stories in there.
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Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#149763 - 02/14/04 08:09 PM Re: Down Under Electrical Accidents
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Just a small note, there are the odd gruesome references to injuries in this site.
Only in text though, discretion is advised.

[This message has been edited by Trumpy (edited 02-14-2004).]
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Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#149764 - 02/15/04 12:50 AM Re: Down Under Electrical Accidents
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Some interesting reports there.

 Quote:
The contracts manager contacted the network owner to find out if electrical services were in the area where they were digging, and a verbal reply from his office was that there were no cables. The following day work began on digging holes and on the third hole an air hammer struck an 11,000 volt cable.

Once again the contractor failed to obtain clear assurance that the area was safe to work.

A written confirmation would provide suitable evidence that inquiries were made, but I would place the blame with the network employee who apparently told the colntractor that the area was clear without bothering to check properly.

 Quote:
A 15 year old youth received serious burns when he made contact with live parts on a berm mounted 11kV oil switch unit. It would appear that the busbar extension end cover had been removed previously by unauthorised persons. The youth was removing the heat shrink cover from one of the busbars when a flashover occurred. In order to ensure better protection from such vandalism of electrical equipment in the public environment, the use of anti tamper type fixing screws on covers needs to be considered

It's sad to think that vandal-proof fixings are now necessary in such cases. What part of "Danger - High voltage" did he not understand?

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#149765 - 02/20/04 12:52 AM Re: Down Under Electrical Accidents
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
The sad part about all of this Paul,
is I was driving past the Xformer down the road from my place (the one that Faulted a few months back) to find a Fencing Contractor driving a pick into the concrete to break it up.
I told him to be careful as there were 33kV cables leading up into the Xformer.
He asked me where they were, I checked my cable location diagrams and sprayed the area with neon paint.
I came back later, no Contractor, but a failed 33kv feeder and a pick right through my paint mark.
In hind-sight, after digging up the cable, the pick was welded to the cable.
This is the junction of 6 33kV cables.
There was a piece of hardened rock next to the pick though!.
_________________________
Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#149766 - 02/28/04 04:24 AM Re: Down Under Electrical Accidents
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Just want to relate this to you people.
Upon a Faults call tonight, as part of sectionalising a block of 4 roads, I had an ABS(Air-Break Switch) explode and rain down on me.
Had I not been wearing my Fire Service bunker coat and Helmet+ visor at the time, I'd be in hospital now.
These ABS's are made for dropping loads and can also be closed on load too.
This must be one of the faulty batch that were made in the late 1980's, along with the Oil-filled Earth switches, that fire hot oil at you, if you shut them too quickly!.
_________________________
Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#149767 - 02/28/04 12:28 PM Re: Down Under Electrical Accidents
Bjarney Offline
Moderator

Registered: 04/10/02
Posts: 2561
Loc: West-Southern Inner-Northeast ...
Trumpy’s advice is well heeded. A healthy respect for >600-volt gear is always warranted. [As is for <600V gear, too.] There is a phenomenal amount of heat and acoustic-shock energy in electric arcs.

You may not be directly involved with operating >600V distribution equipment, but it still is good to have some understanding of its capabilities in a malfunction. [One source of deadly accidents has been tradesman not identifying higher-voltage equipment, as NOT being 600V-class gear…like attempting to apply a (<1 kV) Simpson or Triplett multimeter to live 15kV-class circuits.]

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#149768 - 03/10/04 01:46 AM Re: Down Under Electrical Accidents
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Bjarney,
Interesting that you should mention Test Equipment with HV.
Just how are circuits of different voltage identified in the US?.
As in different wire colours?
Or is it a case of "you don't know until you test"?.
I am thinking that you can't put Warning Signs everywhere.
_________________________
Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#149769 - 03/10/04 02:58 AM Re: Down Under Electrical Accidents
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Mike,
I'm not sure about HV, but on low-voltage where both 120/208 and 277/480V systems are present in a building, different color coding is used to identify them, typically:

Black/red/blue + white neutral for 120/208
Brown/orange/yellow + gray neutral for 277/480

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#149770 - 03/10/04 08:45 AM Re: Down Under Electrical Accidents
Bjarney Offline
Moderator

Registered: 04/10/02
Posts: 2561
Loc: West-Southern Inner-Northeast ...
We must learn to read {large AND small} equipment labels, and treat equipment as live and at a higher voltage until unambiguously determined otherwise. The basic concepts of “OSHA” 29CFR1910.331-335 must be applied.

We’ve all heard it many times—don’t forget that you are responsible for your own safety, but also we should never compromise the safety of our fellow workmates.

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