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#148847 - 05/02/03 03:26 AM Earring electrocution
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England

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#148848 - 05/02/03 11:54 AM Re: Earring electrocution
Bjarney Offline
Moderator

Registered: 04/10/02
Posts: 2561
Loc: West-Southern Inner-Northeast ...
Gee whiz... I never imagined that the safety ground on my foil-covered/foil-lined [double radiation shield] hardhat may not be the best idea.

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#148849 - 05/02/03 12:06 PM Re: Earring electrocution
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Somehow, I think that if there had have been a bit of common-sense used, that young guy would still be alive.
But, we are all constantly reminded that using(or having) bare metal around live electrical equipment,is just asking for trouble.
I have a clause in my Employment Contract that prohibits me from wearing jewellery and any other dangerous fitting(whatever that is! )while under the employment of The Company.
Getting a shock like this is not my idea of a good time.

[This message has been edited by Trumpy (edited 05-02-2003).]
_________________________
Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#148850 - 05/02/03 04:57 PM Re: Earring electrocution
sparky Offline
Member

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
I am always aware of my wedding ring, which i'm very careful of.

It hasn't come off in 15 years,(i doubt it can anyway) and i'll be dipped in s**t if some faction of the safety junta is going to tell me it has to.

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#148851 - 05/02/03 06:16 PM Re: Earring electrocution
NJwirenut Offline
Member

Registered: 09/15/01
Posts: 816
Loc: Bergen County, NJ
It would seem to me that if his head was that close to a 6.6 kV circuit, the earring wouldn't make much of a difference. High voltages have a way of "reaching out and grabbing you" if you get too close.

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#148852 - 05/04/03 04:35 AM Re: Earring electrocution
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
NJ,
That's precisely the thought that came into my mind. Even if we just look at direct contact, if he was close enough for the earring to touch, then he must have been so close that his ear could have touched the live part directly anyway.

In one telecoms facility where I onced worked we had 28V distribution busbars for the newer digital equipment. Anyone who came into that part of the building and starting scoffing about "What can it do? It's only 28 volts" was taken down an aisle to where there was a severe burn mark on the floor, directly below a pair of the 28V bars.

It was then explained to him that this was where a workman several years earlier had been on the cable trays above the busbars and had dropped a uninsulated tool directly across them. The short-circuit current was so high that the tool had just fallen as a molten mass of hot metal within a couple of seconds.

The tap-offs into equipment bays had protective fuses, but if someone were to accidentally get a ring, metal watch strap or something similar across the supply the short-circuit current would turn it red-hot so quickly that the result could be severe burns.

Steve,
Have you thought about securing some sort of insulating sleeve over your ring finger if the need ever arose?

Does any manufacturer actually produce an item specifically designed for this purpose?

[This message has been edited by pauluk (edited 05-04-2003).]

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#148853 - 05/04/03 09:34 AM Re: Earring electrocution
resqcapt19 Offline
Member

Registered: 11/10/00
Posts: 2209
Loc: IL
sparky,
 Quote:
It hasn't come off in 15 years,(i doubt it can anyway) and i'll be dipped in s**t if some faction of the safety junta is going to tell me it has to.

So she'd rather have you lose a finger or get killed!!! No one who does mechanical or electrical work should ever wear any type of ring while working. Even other people need to be careful. I know of a nurse who lost her finger when her ring was caught in a door handle as she was rushing to get the "crash cart" and a fire fighter who had to get 15 stitches because his ring got caught on the door of the fire truck as he jumped out .
_________________________
Don(resqcapt19)

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#148854 - 05/04/03 10:25 AM Re: Earring electrocution
ga.sparky56 Offline
Member

Registered: 11/24/02
Posts: 582
Loc: young harris georgia usa
I've been married 28 yrs and haven't worn a wedding ring in about 25. I got a pretty good burn betweenhot wire and frame on a car once,and when it came off,I never put it back on. I personally don't like jewelry,but thats just me.

Russell

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#148855 - 05/04/03 02:37 PM Re: Earring electrocution
sparky Offline
Member

Registered: 10/18/00
Posts: 5545
yep,
been to a few 'deglovings'due to rings myself Don.

but my ring is small, imbedded, and probably less a hazard that glasses, zippers, steel toes, belt buckles, or tool pouches the size of shopping bags.

I feel my ring is my choice, not some bueracrats, thanks.

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#148856 - 05/04/03 06:48 PM Re: Earring electrocution
NJwirenut Offline
Member

Registered: 09/15/01
Posts: 816
Loc: Bergen County, NJ
A few wraps of electrical tape over the ring reduces the electrical part of the hazard, anyway.

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