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#140386 - 02/29/04 09:12 PM How not to install an electric shower:
djk Offline
Member

Registered: 12/26/02
Posts: 1269
Loc: Ireland
I stumbled across this picture from India


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#140387 - 02/29/04 11:55 PM Re: How not to install an electric shower:
Texas_Ranger Offline
Member

Registered: 12/17/01
Posts: 2343
Loc: Vienna, Austria
If he'd moved the cord out of the way there wouldn't be any problem with that. Those heaters are usually 1500W, so no prob with the socket rating. Maybe it's a bit close to the shower, ok. But no problem with the wiring. See those connected to Schuko plugs all the time.

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#140388 - 03/01/04 05:19 AM Re: How not to install an electric shower:
C-H Offline

Member

Registered: 09/17/02
Posts: 1508
Loc: Stockholm, Sweden
The socket appears not to be rated for wet areas. Even if it is, is it sufficiently high up on the wall to come out of the shower zone? Is it RCD protected?

The power (15/16A?) could be sufficient if this is a hot water cylinder and not an instantaneous water heater. The cord appears too thin for the latter. I'm more curious about the plumbing.

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#140389 - 03/01/04 08:45 AM Re: How not to install an electric shower:
djk Offline
Member

Registered: 12/26/02
Posts: 1269
Loc: Ireland
It's a BS546 socket/plug although may comply with an Indian version of that standard.

It would be rated 15A although thesedays may have been re-rated to 16A in India.

I have no idea wheather an RCD is fitted but would suspect, given the apparent age of the installation, that is could be simply fused.

The cord looks about right... the enormous size of the BS546 plug and the unusual size of the box it's mounted in make it look much smaller than it is.

[This message has been edited by djk (edited 03-01-2004).]

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#140390 - 03/01/04 09:00 AM Re: How not to install an electric shower:
C-H Offline

Member

Registered: 09/17/02
Posts: 1508
Loc: Stockholm, Sweden
There appears to be an Indian standard which contains the BS 546 5A and 15A plugs, but in 6A and 16A version, just like in South Africa.

IS 1293:1988 "Plugs and socket outlets of rated voltage up to and including 250 volts and rated current upto and including 16 amperes"

{Edited twice to correct numbers}

[This message has been edited by C-H (edited 03-01-2004).]

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#140391 - 03/01/04 09:21 AM Re: How not to install an electric shower:
SvenNYC Offline
Member

Registered: 08/19/02
Posts: 1685
Loc: New York City
They should have at least used a plastic box for the wall socket though.

That thing it's in now looks like a metal surface-mount "handy box" that is severely rusted.

I've seen worse. There are some flash heater types that attach to the showerhead. And the picture I saw of one showed little wire pigtails taped to the supply wires hanging in the air over the water pipe.

Is the water in India really that cold that you need a water heater?

I know some warm areas of countries near the tropics (or even in the USA Southwest) you can bathe quite comfortably in the cool-to-room temp. water that comes straight out of the pipe.

When I was in Tucson, Arizona I just opened the cold water tap when taking a shower or washing my hands or whatever. Here in New York, the water comes from the mountains outside the city so the water is pretty icy year round.

[This message has been edited by SvenNYC (edited 03-01-2004).]

[This message has been edited by SvenNYC (edited 03-01-2004).]

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#140392 - 03/02/04 03:10 AM Re: How not to install an electric shower:
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
It looks like a storage-type water heater (just a few gallons) rather than an instantaneous type. Could be rated at up to around 3kW, and the cord looks about right in comaprison to the plug: BS546 plugs really are bulky.

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#140393 - 03/02/04 12:41 PM Re: How not to install an electric shower:
Texas_Ranger Offline
Member

Registered: 12/17/01
Posts: 2343
Loc: Vienna, Austria
Hard to tell from the picture, but to me it looks like the evil 100l storage type they sell at every hardware store here. IIRC 230V 1500W, usually connected via Schuko plug and socket. I'd definitely placed the outlet near the top of the cylinder though.

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#140394 - 03/03/04 04:47 AM Re: How not to install an electric shower:
djk Offline
Member

Registered: 12/26/02
Posts: 1269
Loc: Ireland
SvenNYC


It can be nice to have a warmer than room temp shower though Even in the tropics..

Old (1920s/30s) bathrooms here would have commonly had local gas water heaters.

Modern small local electric heaters are still quite common in places where there is no hotwater system. Commonly found in a cupboard under the sink in office kitchens.

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#140395 - 03/04/04 12:36 AM Re: How not to install an electric shower:
Texas_Ranger Offline
Member

Registered: 12/17/01
Posts: 2343
Loc: Vienna, Austria
Until the 1970ies central heating systems didn't really catch here, so wall mount gas water heaters (usually 5 or 10l on-demand types, I once posted a pic of a 5l type) are still pretty common. I think replacements are still readily available.
I looked up www.baumax.at, here's the facts about electric storage heaters.
120l tank, 2000W, 230V, stainless steel tank,6 bar max. pressure, 119 Euro.
5l open system 39,99 Euro.

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