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#138174 - 08/17/03 08:47 PM Receptacle Challenge
WebSparky Offline
Member

Registered: 02/21/03
Posts: 144
Loc: Cleveland, Ohio
Here's a challenge!

I've never seen one of these before.
This is a manufactured device used in a manufacturer's testing department.

This unit is made to plug in to 115V@60Hz and then it supplies the receptacles with 220V@50Hz. This is for the testing of all of the overseas appliances.

Here is the challenge......... Name the Countries associated with each receptacle shown. We'll number them from left to right, top to bottom.

Here is a clue......... There are 13 Countries involved.



This is just for fun! If I had to identify these........ no way!

Dave
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#138175 - 08/18/03 12:59 AM Re: Receptacle Challenge
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Some of these receptacles are used in more than one country, so it would be impossible to be certain as to the actual 13 countries involved. Anyway, here goes:

1. Australian outlet, also New Zealand, Fiji
2. British BS1363 used in U.K., Ireland, Malta, Cyprus
3. French, also used in Belgium and parts of eastern Europe
4. Old British BS546 15A, could be for South Africa or India
5. Schuko, used widely in many European countries (Germany, Austria, Sweden, Spain, etc.)
6. Switzerland
7. Italy

Years ago, many old British repair shops had a similar board fitted with all the different receptacles which were then in common use in this country.

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#138176 - 08/18/03 04:15 AM Re: Receptacle Challenge
ThinkGood Offline
Member

Registered: 08/07/02
Posts: 1084
Loc: Milwaukee, WI
Don't have a clue

However, #4 looks something similar to what I noticed in the hallway of a hospital (here in the US) recently.

Any ideas?

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#138177 - 08/18/03 05:06 AM Re: Receptacle Challenge
C-H Offline

Member

Registered: 09/17/02
Posts: 1508
Loc: Stockholm, Sweden
Paul,

No 3 is a Danish (13A) socket, not a French!

Not forgetting No 0 (the plug!) which is American.

[This message has been edited by C-H (edited 08-18-2003).]

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#138178 - 08/18/03 06:04 AM Re: Receptacle Challenge
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Danish? So it is. Sorry!

On closer inspection I can see the spade-shaped ground hole. At first glance I thought it was the ground-pin sticking up on an upside-down French outlet. That'll teach me to look more closely in future!

TG,
I can't imagine why you'd have something like the BS546 (socket #4) in a hospital there, unless it was installed for some special purpose. Could it have been the smaller 5A version? These 15A types are really huge!

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#138179 - 08/18/03 07:10 AM Re: Receptacle Challenge
djk Offline
Member

Registered: 12/26/02
Posts: 1269
Loc: Ireland
Paul UK,

Common in hospitals to fit all the cleaning equipment with BS546 plugs so that contract cleaners are not tempted to use sockets supplying sensitive equipment in wards! Although very sensitive equipment usually uses keyed plugs (often locked into the socket and clearly marked)

I donno why you'd have a BS546 plug in the US though.

And yeah they are HUGE pins are as fat as your fingers! Looks like it was designed to connect up an entire house never mind a 15 amp vacuum cleaner

Can you imagine.. oops! was that a ventilator! Thought it was the lamp

Doesn't the Danish socket look like a smiley face hehe

[This message has been edited by djk (edited 08-18-2003).]

[This message has been edited by djk (edited 08-18-2003).]

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#138180 - 08/18/03 08:09 AM Re: Receptacle Challenge
SvenNYC Offline
Member

Registered: 08/19/02
Posts: 1685
Loc: New York City
 Quote:
However, #4 looks something similar to what I noticed in the hallway of a hospital (here in the US) recently.


YES!!! I've been meaning to ask this question also. We have similar them on the pillars of subway train statinons in New York City. Some have been replaced with twist-lock recepts for 240 volts at 30 amps (I believe). Others with standard NEMA 5-20 sockets (for 110 volts).

They also used to be in Elmhurst Hospital in New York when I was a kid (before vast renovations).

Apparently the ones in the hospital had standard 110-volt current across them because I routinely saw wall-mounted fans plugged into them -- somehow the flat pins of the plugs did make contact with the sleeves inside the receptacles. The socket had a red box painted around it.

However the dimensions of the 15-amp British socket is MUCH bigger. The three-round-hole sockets that I've seen are closer to the smaller 5-amp British socket.

I'm wondering if these are actually those pin-and-sleeve sockets used for high amperage stuff...except those have a locking collar. The ones I saw didn't have that....they seemed like standard receptacles slightly recessed in the hole in the plate.

I remember once in the subway a crew was using some piece of machinery. It was plugged into a short extension cord that had a contemporary type female cordcap on one end and into the wall recept was stuck this HUGE brass plug.

I think it even had a threaded collar for locking the plug into place (the outlet has a collar for a protective screw cap that flips down after you've finished).

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#138181 - 08/18/03 01:11 PM Re: Receptacle Challenge
djk Offline
Member

Registered: 12/26/02
Posts: 1269
Loc: Ireland
I wonder if the old standard for 240V outlets in the US happened to be based on the only other system standardised at 240-250V and widely deployed around the world at the time. BS 546.

?

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#138182 - 08/18/03 02:24 PM Re: Receptacle Challenge
WebSparky Offline
Member

Registered: 02/21/03
Posts: 144
Loc: Cleveland, Ohio
Don't look unless you want the answers!

!
!
!
!
!
!
!

1. Australia
2. British
3. Denmark
4. India and South Africa
5. Norway, Findland, Sweden, Germany, Austia and Netherlands
6. Switzerland
7. Italy
_________________________
Dave

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#138183 - 08/18/03 02:48 PM Re: Receptacle Challenge
Plugman Offline
Member

Registered: 08/03/03
Posts: 15
Loc: England
Well, all those were individual sockets ~

How about this one, found at www.cambre.com.ar

Oh drat! tried to put a picture in here, but it didn't work ~ sorry 'bout that.
Look under page 'modulos',on the product section, for item No.6908,it's a gem of a socket !

[This message has been edited by Plugman (edited 08-18-2003).]

[This message has been edited by Plugman (edited 08-18-2003).]

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