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#135596 - 01/18/03 07:34 PM TV Connectors?
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
I think I may have touched on this subject,
before, but what type of connector for TV and
Cable(if available), is used in your country?.
We are only just starting to move away from the older Belling-Lee style arrangement, in favour of the newer F-type connector.
All of our splitter equipment is now F-type, it makes sense to change and they never come loose either.
Your thoughts on this-
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#135597 - 01/18/03 09:56 PM Re: TV Connectors?
SvenNYC Offline
Member

Registered: 08/19/02
Posts: 1685
Loc: New York City
F-Plug here in NTSC land.

BNC connectors are used for video-security systems and some pro video setups (because it's faster to hook up but still just as secure).

There are two types of F-plugs. Push-on and screw-on. I prefer screw-on.

Some TV sets use screw-terminals with spade lugs on twin-lead set-top "rabbit ear aerials".

I recently saw a stereo in a hi-fi store that used a PAL antenna jack for the FM antenna (looks almost like an F-plug but the center pin is hollow or something), which I thought was weird. Maybe the manufacturer got a good deal on them?

Trumpy do you have a picture of the Belling-Lee plug you could post?

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#135598 - 01/19/03 04:40 AM Re: TV Connectors?
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
The Belling-Lee plug has been standard in the U.K. for just about as long as TV has been around. Our TVs have always been designed for 72 ohm coaxial -- The American-style 300-ohm twin feeder never caught on here.

Here's a Belling-Lee plug:


And an in-line B-L socket:


Sockets are also available to fit a standard single-gang wall box:


The Belling-Lee plug is also found on FM broadcast receivers, although some of these (notably Japanese imports) also provide for 300-ohm twin lead.

When it comes to satellite and cable installations, the F-type plug has become the defacto standard.

For direct video and audio connections, domestic equipment often uses RCA jacks (called "phono sockets" here) for both, although older VCRs used BNC for video.

We also now have a big multi-way connector commonly referred to as a SCART plug:

This is a common European connector found on practically all domestic TV/VCR equipment these days which provides direct RGB video, stereo audio connections etc. all on one plug. It supposedly makes it easy for the layman to interconnect equipment, but in practice there are often problems!

Much low-end new equipment now comes with no other direct video/audio connections other than a couple of SCART sockets.


[This message has been edited by pauluk (edited 01-19-2003).]

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#135599 - 01/19/03 08:52 AM Re: TV Connectors?
Hutch Offline
Member

Registered: 05/27/02
Posts: 383
Loc: South Oxfordshire, UK
Belling-Lee - Never heard them called that before. In South Africa (which uses them) I referred to them as FM plugs and over here in the States they are known as PAL connectors. I have a couple of PAL to F-type adapters that I purchased at Radio Shack to connect my imported multi-system, multi-voltage TV and video system when I arrived here. Having worked with both types, my vote goes for the F-type connector. As Trumpy says, being screw-on they make for a more positive connection. Also, they are more easily wired up with the male ‘pin’ being formed from the coaxial core and the sheath being crimped on. The tiny screws and compression ring in the PAL connector were always, for me, a weak link in the chain, and a source of a poor signal.

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#135600 - 01/21/03 12:10 PM Re: TV Connectors?
Texas_Ranger Offline
Member

Registered: 12/17/01
Posts: 2343
Loc: Vienna, Austria
Belling-Lee for 75 Ohm antenna, F for satellite. Any equipment from the 60ies or eralier used to have 2 single pin plugs with 4mm pins, commonly referred to as "banana plugs". They were used on virtually any electronics product back then (radio, reel-to-reel tape recorder, record player, TV,...). With audio equipment this was superceded by DIN connectors and later RCA jacks (some appliances still have DIN plugs, but they're very rare by now). NF was BNC with old stuff, nowadays Scart or RCA. Is Scart used in the US? I think it was originally called "Euro-Scart".

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#135601 - 01/21/03 12:37 PM Re: TV Connectors?
SvenNYC Offline
Member

Registered: 08/19/02
Posts: 1685
Loc: New York City
 Quote:
Is Scart used in the US? I think it was originally called "Euro-Scart."


No. As far as I know, SCART is not used in NTSC television sets.

I'm familiar with Bananna plugs. They're used on some multimeters and other test kit for electronics (radio/TV repair)

Aside from F-plugs for 75-ohm antenna connections, RCA (phono) jacks for line-level audio & video and BNC for security systems, we have something called S-Video (common in high-end video tape and disk equipment), which uses a tiny round multi-contact plug that is similar to a Mini-DIN, the type of plug used on modern-day computer mice and keyboards.

Here is a picture of an S-Video jack:


[This message has been edited by SvenNYC (edited 01-21-2003).]

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#135602 - 01/21/03 01:46 PM Re: TV Connectors?
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Yes, SCART is a European invention, although I think it has now spread to other parts of the world, North America excluded.

For further details: http://www.rgbtosvideo.com/tech/scartconnector.pdf

The S-video 4-pin connectors are found here now as well, although obviously in most cases they are carrying 625/PAL signals.

Standard banana plugs were also once very common on much equipment here, although for domestic radios etc. a smaller "split-pin" type of plug was used, commonly known as a "wander plug." They were often found as antenna and ground connections on 1950s radios.

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#135603 - 01/21/03 09:38 PM Re: TV Connectors?
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Paul,
Is that true about 300 ohm Ribbon?, I thought that us over here in NZ, took our first TV reciever systems, from the UK system?, which meant Huge low-band VHF aerials, and Ribbon cable.
Believe me, Paul, we are still taking out Ribbon from elderly peoples homes, who have just purchased a new digital TV set(for some reason, I've been told, these TV's are louder),and a hearing aid is not required to watch them.
But, with regards to F-connectors, I prefer the crimp type, especially for Outdoor connections, these have a special sealing grease in the rear part and a rubber O-ring in the front part of the plug, where the centre conductor protrudes, these are standard in all of my aerial installations.
_________________________
Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#135604 - 02/02/03 09:17 PM Re: TV Connectors?
Trumpy Offline

Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
Can anyone tell me what the maximum length of run, of a low-level signal cable is?.
I am talking about SCART leads and S-VHS leads.
Is there an amplifier that can be inserted,
mid-way, to maintain the signal levels, over a great length of run.
Your help please?.-
_________________________
Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#135605 - 02/05/03 04:26 PM Re: TV Connectors?
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Sorry Trumpy, I missed your earlier question about the antenna feeders.

I can't say that 300-ohm twin lead was never used on very early sets here, but I've worked on vintage British TV sets dating right back to the late 1940s and I've never found anything other than the Belling-Lee coaxial type of connector.

On signal leads, the main limiting factor for video signals is the attenuation and phase shift of the higher frequency components of the signal. That's determined largely by a combination of the cable's capacitance and the impedance of the source, so the total allowable length can vary considerably.

It's certainly possible to insert amplifiers to maintain signals levels on long cable runs. The principle is used extensively on long-distance telephone trunks, undersea communication cables, etc.

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