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#126300 - 06/29/04 08:12 PM High Voltage Wires
Webmaster Offline

Administrator
Member

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 3142
Loc: NY, USA
 Quote:
Edison, New Jersey June 2004. How does the Utility get away with using a shield and no conduit up to at least 8 feet. These are High Voltage wires that were accessible to anyone who passed by!

(submitted by Joe Tedesco)







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#126301 - 06/29/04 08:48 PM Re: High Voltage Wires
DougW Offline
Member

Registered: 06/08/03
Posts: 1083
Loc: North Chicago, IL
I'd bet that the lower 1/3 of the shield (the bottom 8') got removed - whether intentionally or not. There's discoloration on the pole by the conductors that looks like it's in line with where a shield should be (and once was).

Still no excuse for leaving it that way. Ick.

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#126302 - 06/29/04 09:23 PM Re: High Voltage Wires
electure Offline
Member

Registered: 12/24/00
Posts: 4226
Loc: Fullerton, CA USA
They don't have to fix it because they make their own rules?
90.2(B)(5)b.

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#126303 - 06/29/04 10:55 PM Re: High Voltage Wires
e57 Offline
Member

Registered: 05/27/03
Posts: 2837
Loc: S.F.,CA USA
They're ruled by a higher power....

They're insurance company!

I'm sure if pointed out to them, they'll be on it. Hope someone called...

Although, I think that is ground sheilded wire? (Some of the linemen correct me please, if I'm wrong.) But still not hip without a duct cover!
_________________________
Mark Heller
"Well - I oughta....." -Jackie Gleason

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#126304 - 06/30/04 12:34 PM Re: High Voltage Wires
Lostazhell Offline
Member

Registered: 02/21/04
Posts: 1248
Loc: Bakersfield, CA (Originally Or...
A gardner with a bladed weed wacker could end up with a serious suprise edging around that pole! Even the shield is gone!

-Randy

Edited for pselling

[This message has been edited by Lostazhell (edited 06-30-2004).]

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#126305 - 06/30/04 02:01 PM Re: High Voltage Wires
CharlieE Offline
Member

Registered: 04/23/04
Posts: 204
Loc: Indianapolis
Consider the number of poles an electric utility has on their system. Now, ask yourself how they can possibly keep up with defects like this? If someone doesn't tell them there is a problem with the U-Guard on the pole in the Westchester Peoples National Bank, East lawn, how will they know to replace the missing section?
_________________________
Charlie Eldridge, Indianapolis Utility Power Guy

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#126306 - 06/30/04 06:13 PM Re: High Voltage Wires
Joe Tedesco Offline
Member

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 3325
Loc: Boston, Massachusetts USA
I want to know why the High Voltage lines are not required to be installed in a 230.43 wiring method, and in accordance with 300.5 for the protection up to 8 feet!

I cannot understand! Yes, we know it is a utility company installation and is not covered by the NEC.

What happens when some street person decides to get some "aluminum" to sell for the price of a bottle of wine?

How about the weed whacker!
_________________________
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

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#126307 - 06/30/04 06:32 PM Re: High Voltage Wires
Lostazhell Offline
Member

Registered: 02/21/04
Posts: 1248
Loc: Bakersfield, CA (Originally Or...
CharlieE wrote:
 Quote:
Consider the number of poles an electric utility has on their system. Now, ask yourself how they can possibly keep up with defects like this?


I agree with that... There's been quite a few calls I've made to the Poco's here regarding hazards from broken primary crossarms to even an open transformer box on a busy street! (12KV-480Y/277V) (left open by a sub-contractor according to Glendale Power ) & they seem to respond pretty quickly for the most part... (Glendale Power had someone there in 20 mins, I told them I'd keep people away from it until they showed up)
Joe, is this at a corner where the pole could've been "hugged" by a semi-trailer & the guard ripped off? Another thing, if theses conductors are only under the metal guard, is the guard bonded in case it should become electrified??? Around here I usually only see the metal guards used on phone/cable lines..

-Randy

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#126308 - 07/01/04 04:33 AM Re: High Voltage Wires
Big Ed Offline
Member

Registered: 04/07/04
Posts: 56
Loc: Roxboro, NC, USA
I work at a power plant and get the "We're a utility, the code doesn't apply" argument occasionally. My opinion is that just because we aren't FORCED to use it does not mean that we shouldn't. Granted, there are some applications where you just can't, but for the most part it is applicable.

On a side note: High voltage cable should have an internal shield, just under the jacket. It SHOULD keep someone from getting lit-up if they pierce the cable(I am not going to try it to find out.)
Of course that is assuming that their relaying is working correctly.

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#126309 - 07/01/04 05:07 AM Re: High Voltage Wires
CharlieE Offline
Member

Registered: 04/23/04
Posts: 204
Loc: Indianapolis
Actually, the Code does apply. It just so happens that the Code is the NESC and most people are not aware of it, including most electric utility employees. It is used in the engineering area to write the electric utility's standards. The rest of the company will follow the standards but have no idea that they are, in fact, following the intent of the NESC.

The NESC is a performance document; the NEC is a prescriptive document. The difference is that the end result is given in the NESC and how you get there is up to you (that is why we have engineers and standards). The NEC just gives you the rules, follow the rules and you are in compliance.

In this case, the electric utility is in violation of NESC rule 360A which refers you to Rule 239D. To give you an idea of the language, Rule 239D2 states, "Where guarding is required, conductors and cables shall be protected by covering or conduit that gives suitable mechanical protection." Schedule 40 U-Guard will not suitably protect this riser but schedule 80 U-Guard would do nicely. Notice the rule says "where guarding is required", if it is in a substation or similar guarded area, the protection may be reduced or eliminated.

I know this will not everyone from thinking we can do whatever we want but we do have a set of rules we are required to follow.
_________________________
Charlie Eldridge, Indianapolis Utility Power Guy

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