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#125511 - 12/19/04 04:48 PM "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", right?
Joe Tedesco Offline
Member

Registered: 10/07/00
Posts: 3325
Loc: Boston, Massachusetts USA
 Quote:
Trying to convince my manager to correct our violations/unsafe wiring that exists at our plant in NY State.



It's hard to change the: "It's worked for x amount of time, and it's working now, why spend the money and time to fix something that is working.". "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", right?



First three are of a fluorescent fixture either fed or feeding, with conductors in free air passing through a plywood wall, butt-crimp connected!

Notice SO or SJ cord passing over top of wall, clearly in one pic.



Other pics are of a 120V receptacle with the stranded grounding conductor pigtailed, so short that the receptacle can barely clear the box to work on it.



Half the strands are not even under the screw, which was loose, also.

All other conductors, stranded, screws loose, too.


I have camera will travel and will find even more hazards!

Will the sender please step up to the mike!
_________________________
Joe Tedesco, NEC Consultant

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#125512 - 12/19/04 09:14 PM Re: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", right?
bp-redbear Offline
Member

Registered: 08/30/04
Posts: 53
Loc: NY
Joe T. and other readers,

There are many more violations, I will be sending more pics when I take them.

Though I am making my supervisor aware of the violations, I am unsure if the co. is willing to correct them. Sometimes the co. is very slow to take action, and not being a supervisor, I am not in the circle of "those in the know", as to what are in the plans. I certainly hope the co. will follow my advice, and bring things up to code. I am unsure if I am being appreciated for pointing out unsafe conditions, or if I am being labeled as a trouble-maker.

Recall my pic titled "Hot Receptacle" on this forum. That is no longer in existence, mostly because the room that had the "hot receptacle" (duplex in a baseboard heater) has since been demolished/remodeled. When I brought this to the attention of several people, about all I got was "That's been that way for quite a while." When I told one co-worker that the receptacle was still powered, he commented "I just figured it had been turned off." Well, it certainly hadn't! As my voltstick showed in that photo. (A few weeks back, on this forum.)

I certainly do not want to see a fire in the plant in which I work, or see anyone injured or killed, so I will continue to point out unsafe conditions.

Thanks for the offer of the camera, I don't have permission to post these, as it is. I will continue to use mine for now. Of course you could find more violations at our plant, you would be cringing and shaking your head just about every where you looked. We now have two other mechanic/electricians along with myself who believe in doing work properly, and fixing work that is not. But, like I said, it's hard to break that old "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." attitude.

Thanks for posting the pics.

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#125513 - 12/20/04 05:48 AM Re: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", right?
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Open splices like these are all too common.

Is that really 120V on the receptacle? I'm just wondering why it's fed with orange and gray. I know that could still be to code if color coding was consistent throughout the building, but it seems rather odd. Any chance it's really 277V and sombody replaced the receptacle with the wrong type?

Also, what's the little red marker below the ground on the right-hand side of the recept?

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#125514 - 12/20/04 03:53 PM Re: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", right?
bp-redbear Offline
Member

Registered: 08/30/04
Posts: 53
Loc: NY
Paul,

Yes, it is really 120VAC on the receptacle, as measured. (I wondered myself, originally.)

Yes, the color coding is a bit odd. You should see some of the motor control centers, every color of the spectrum in some!!

Small round sticker, orange triangle in white background: no idea, my initial thought was: "Hospital receptacle? or some unique code."
Maybe it identifies a breaker to someone? No clue at present.

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#125515 - 12/20/04 04:27 PM Re: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", right?
Trumpy Offline
Member

Registered: 07/05/02
Posts: 8540
Loc: SI,New Zealand
It's not the symbol for an Isolated Ground receptacle, is it?.
Or for a receptacle that has a supply from a GFCI?
Just a few guesses!.

{Message edited to correct a spelling error}

[This message has been edited by Trumpy (edited 12-20-2004).]
_________________________
Let's face it, these days if you're not young, you're old - Red Green grin

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#125516 - 12/20/04 05:39 PM Re: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", right?
winnie Offline
Member

Registered: 09/15/03
Posts: 652
Loc: boston, ma
The orange triangle is the symbol for an isolated ground receptacle.
http://www.passandseymour.com/knowhowfaq/showquestions.cfm?faqcategory=National%20Electrical%20Code

-Jon

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#125517 - 12/20/04 06:14 PM Re: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", right?
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
 Quote:
Yes, it is really 120VAC on the receptacle,

Fair enough, just looked odd. Is there actually 277 in the building as well? If so, and the colors are a real mixture elsewhere, then could we assume this constitutes another violation? (Circuits of different voltage levels not properly identified throughout.)

 Quote:
The orange triangle is the symbol for an isolated ground receptacle


Ah.... Orange is the key; it looks more like red on my monitor. I hadn't realized that recepts with a full orange face were no longer code for IG applications.

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#125518 - 12/20/04 09:42 PM Re: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", right?
bp-redbear Offline
Member

Registered: 08/30/04
Posts: 53
Loc: NY
Ah, isolated ground may explain the unused datacom cables that are coiled up on the wall in this room (coming out of conduit, not in the pics).

The SO cord in the pics also appears to be not in use, along with another flexible cord coming from somewhere, with about about 16 feet of it coiled up and hanging on the wall.

This room appears to have been used for computers or data, office or some previous purpose (with all the wiring left behind.

Paul:
Yes, there is 277V in the bldg. Exclusively for lighting (as far as I know at this point). (Along with 208VAC and 460VAC, color coding is a guessing game, as is obvious.)

Thanks, people.

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