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#118937 - 11/13/04 03:22 PM British Farm Wiring
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Electrical systems on farms often seem to be in a poor, neglected condition. Thanks to SimonUK for submitting the following:

 Quote:
I've a couple of pics of a 3 phase panel thats now open to the elements after a storm took the roof of a shed.

Heres the pics of the three phase socket and isolator that are in everyday use at the farm. The switch at the top is for the ancient diesel pump which is in shillings and pence so you can guess how old it is. The 3-phase plug is for the mig welder which is used nearly every day. The 3-pin plug is for the pressure washer and yes all the electrics get soaked every time its used. The juice comes in from the top and the cable exiting at the bottom goes under three feet of concrete for 50 feet to the slatted house.

I'm starting to work my way round the farm sorting out all the problems. I'm doing it for free as the farmer doesn't take anything off me for storage.

The list of defects is too large to type out here but just to give you an idea of what I'm up against I'll take pics of the main distribution panel tomorrow. You will see fuses that have been pulled for years because they "keep blowing" as soon as you fit them.






Notes for the benefit of non-UK readers:

An item priced in shillings and pence will be pre-1971.

The 3-phase supply here will be our standard 4-wire wye system, 240/415V.

The switch-fuse unit pictured here is a very common type from a company called MEM (Midland Electrical Manufacturing). There are many still in service, although not usually quite so rusty as this one! -Paul.

[This message has been edited by pauluk (edited 11-13-2004).]

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#118938 - 11/14/04 01:16 PM Re: British Farm Wiring
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
More pics from Simon:

 Quote:
In the first cupboard you can see where the power comes in. not a place to be keeping flammable liquids and yes it is kero that was used to clean something in the milk carton.




 Quote:
In the second cupboard you can see the "missing" fuses that keep blowing.



There's a lot of detail to see in that last photo:
Click here for a larger version

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#118939 - 11/14/04 01:25 PM Re: British Farm Wiring
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
What can be said except "What a mess!" ?

Unfortunately, this sort of spaghetti and multiple boxes is all too common in old places which have never been fully rewired.

You can see three of the old-style side-handle boxes, the remainder being the typical 1950s/60s type. The tell-tale green/yellow cable indicates that something has been changed in more recent years though.

Whoever worked on this place really seemed to like MEM switchgear, although I'm not quite sure how that GEC box snuck in!

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#118940 - 11/14/04 04:31 PM Re: British Farm Wiring
Bjarney Offline
Moderator

Registered: 04/10/02
Posts: 2561
Loc: West-Southern Inner-Northeast ...
 
Paul — That's a very nice 'hi-res' linked picture. I think everyone here will likely agree that messy/added-to/piggy-backed wiring is an international {if not intergalactic} problem.

Is that a spool of (in)famous fuse wire at 6 o’clock?

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#118941 - 11/14/04 05:51 PM Re: British Farm Wiring
SimonUK Offline
Member

Registered: 10/15/04
Posts: 50
Loc: Ayrshire, Scotland, UK.
Just wait till you see the rest of the photo's. The hairs on the back of your neck will stand up.

I took 72 today before the batteries in the camera gave up the ghost.

The camera I have is a 5 megapixel and I have no idea how to down scale the photo's yet so poor paul is getting tied up with large emails due to my ignorance.

Simon.

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#118942 - 11/14/04 06:26 PM Re: British Farm Wiring
electure Offline

Member

Registered: 12/24/00
Posts: 4226
Loc: Fullerton, CA USA
Simon,
If you'd like you can send all or part of them to me, and I'll be happy to stick them up. (Well, maybe not all 72)..S
Thanks Paul

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#118943 - 11/14/04 07:04 PM Re: British Farm Wiring
SimonUK Offline
Member

Registered: 10/15/04
Posts: 50
Loc: Ayrshire, Scotland, UK.
Electure, thank you very much for the offer. i'll start sending tomorrow.

I've sent you an email with one of the scariest photo's I've already sent Paul.

There's another pic featuring a blowtorch!!!!. so stay tuned.

Simon.

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#118944 - 11/14/04 07:09 PM Re: British Farm Wiring
SimonUK Offline
Member

Registered: 10/15/04
Posts: 50
Loc: Ayrshire, Scotland, UK.
Oooooopppps, forgot. It's a roll of 60/40 solder at six oclock, which is probably something to do with the blowtorch which will be posted tomorrow.

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#118945 - 11/15/04 06:58 AM Re: British Farm Wiring
SvenNYC Offline
Member

Registered: 08/19/02
Posts: 1685
Loc: New York City
Anyone know the Amp rating of a piece of 60/40 solder wire?

Seriously, considering that stuff is mostly lead....it would probably make for excellent fuse wire. Don't try this at home.

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#118946 - 11/15/04 12:15 PM Re: British Farm Wiring
SimonUK Offline
Member

Registered: 10/15/04
Posts: 50
Loc: Ayrshire, Scotland, UK.
I'm not so sure someone hasn't tried it . I haven't actually climbed up yet to look in the bottom of the cupboard.

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