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#101529 - 09/04/01 12:09 PM 20A Receptacles
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
I was browsing a Home DIY website and in the electrical section came across something which puzzled me. (I'd post the link, but I've completely lost track of where it was now!)

A guy was asking about wiring a workshop. The reply included advice about whether to use 15 or 20A branches for the regular 120V receptacles. I know that 15A recepts. are allowed on a 20A branch in the U.S., but according to this reply the CEC requires 20A recepts. if the breaker is 20A. Fair enough.

It's the next part I can't figure out, because the response went on to say that it may not be worth wiring 20A branches, because of the need to re-plug all the existing 120V power tools with 20A plugs.

A 20A recept. will accept 15 OR 20A plugs. So why would there be a need to change any plugs? Am I missing something, or is the guy responsible for that reply talking out the back of his hat?

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#101530 - 09/04/01 08:44 PM Re: 20A Receptacles
sparky66wv Offline
Member

Registered: 11/17/00
Posts: 2339
Loc: West Virginia
He was talking out the back of his hat... (among other things...)

Yes, both 125V and 250V 20A receptacles that I have ever seen will accept the 15A counterparts because of a T-shaped hole.

Then again... I've been wrong before...

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#101531 - 09/04/01 09:05 PM Re: 20A Receptacles
sparky66wv Offline
Member

Registered: 11/17/00
Posts: 2339
Loc: West Virginia
Wooops!!!!

I was going through the threads under the "today's active topics" part...

Didn't notice this was under the Canadian Section!!

Sorry folks!

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#101532 - 09/04/01 09:08 PM Re: 20A Receptacles
Anonymous
Unregistered


I was assuming that Canadian plugs are NEMA too. So I think your answer is correct.


[This message has been edited by Dspark (edited 09-05-2001).]

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#101533 - 09/04/01 09:27 PM Re: 20A Receptacles
frank Offline
Member

Registered: 05/29/01
Posts: 361
Loc: windsor ontario canada
It might have been older info.I was not permitted to install them until the 94 code(the red one).I got 22 of those nice ARROW HARTS with the built in surge suppressors for free as they were shipped with some dialysis units from the States.Also our devices usually do have a NEMA,UL,and CSA markings but only CSA marked equipment and devices may be installed unless you call inspection.They come down and check for chassis grounding ,overcurrent protection and other common sense things.The cost is usually around $120 for small machines like money changers and pop machines ect.Quite a bid of our stuff is from the States.

[This message has been edited by frank (edited 09-05-2001).]

[This message has been edited by frank (edited 09-05-2001).]

[This message has been edited by frank (edited 09-05-2001).]

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#101534 - 09/05/01 07:39 AM Re: 20A Receptacles
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Same here Virgil:

I have some NEMA 5-20 (125V) and 6-20 (250V) recepts. here. These, and all the ones I've ever seen while in America had the T-shape one side to take either plug.

I just thought maybe they had a different 20A outlet in Canada, though I can't see any in my big Graybar catalog.

Frank:
Was the guy right about the Canadian code requiring 20A recepts. on a 20A branch?

The only variation for Canadian recepts. I can see in the catalog is that some have slotted & Robertson screws instead of slotted/Phillips.

I'm not sure what "Robertson" screws are, but I'm guessing they're your name for what we call "Pozi-Driv" (sic) - Similar to Phillips but with a small star-like arrangement in the center.

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#101535 - 09/05/01 03:47 PM Re: 20A Receptacles
Anonymous
Unregistered


>I'm not sure what "Robertson" screws

I thought the guy was Roberson. Anyway, That's what I call the square holes.

>what we call "Pozi-Driv"
That might be what we call Torx.
But there are some other star-like designs and I don't know all the names.

The hexagonal holes are named for Allen.

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#101536 - 09/05/01 04:09 PM Re: 20A Receptacles
mickky Offline
Member

Registered: 07/22/01
Posts: 48
Loc: toronto
The square ones are called Robertsons, named after the Canadian(!) inventor. Our devices use them. Irritatingly, a device and the box use two different sizes: #6 and #8 (or #2 & #3)
They're great, otherwise. No stripping, and the driver will actually hold the screw in place on it's own.

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#101537 - 09/05/01 04:12 PM Re: 20A Receptacles
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
Definitely "Robertson" in the Graybar catalog.

We have Torx heads here as well but Pozi-Driv is something different. From the markings on tools etc., it appears that "Pozi-Driv" is only a trademark in Britain/Europe, hence my suggestion that they might go under a different trade name elsewhere.

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#101538 - 09/05/01 04:16 PM Re: 20A Receptacles
pauluk Offline
Member

Registered: 08/11/01
Posts: 7693
Loc: Norfolk, England
 Quote:
Originally posted by mickky:
The square ones are called Robertsons, named after the Canadian(!) inventor


Ah... Sounds as though they're not the same thing then.

A Pozi-Driv screwdriver of the correct size will fit a Phillips head well, but not vice versa.

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